Southern Marsh Landscape - Click To Enlarge

Making A Case For A Second Camera

It’s hard to make a case for carrying a second camera, especially out in a marsh or swamp.

With a second camera there is no danger of dropping everything in the muck when changing lens, sand inside, or losing the whole kit in a canal.

With no second camera quick landscapes to document a location means swapping a lens. That also means it’s a guarantee an eagle in a top hat will amble by when everything is in pieces.

If my car is to be near on a trip I might have my backup kit with me. On a dreary day it’s good to have since a long lens, with no light, means trouble. I can still make something of being out ‘where ever’ with local scenes.

Southern Marsh Landscape - Click To Enlarge
Southern Marsh Landscape – Click To Enlarge

Above is the edge of a marsh and lake on a rainy day. I was standing on a dike which ran between the waterways.

Southern Marsh Landscape - Click To Enlarge
Southern Marsh Landscape – Click To Enlarge

This is the fall look of a wide marsh. Reeds and brush have slowly fallen which means we can look out over a distance. Summer the reeds are much taller than a person, block views, and of course teaming with wildlife to photograph.

Southern Marsh Landscape - Click To Enlarge
Southern Marsh Landscape – Click To Enlarge

The last here is a simple ‘look right’ photo. On a trail you can be surrounded with these large live oak trees. Most are covered in vines and spanish moss. This is exactly what people think southern low land country woods are. And a major reason why we photograph here now, not up in snowy, freezing  New England (which I do love, but enough).

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