Young Heron, Testing - Click To Enlarge

Young Heron, Testing Gear

I can’t remember the last time camera equipment was part of an article. To me it’s an important part of photography but not something to be rehashed and beat to death. The results count, good gear is part of the end product. But… every photographer has an opinion.

Young Heron, Testing - Click To Enlarge
Young Heron, Testing – Click To Enlarge

We are outdoors shooting constantly. That takes a toll on equipment. It’s shocking just how durable decent gear can be too.

Recently we had our cameras and several well used lens cleaned and calibrated. The previous time I did this caused more problems than anything else.

Young Heron, Testing - Click To Enlarge
Young Heron, Testing – Click To Enlarge

This time I was sure to test everything right away. My results were mixed, but in general it helped.

The images here were taken with the ‘problem’ gear. My backup body is a Canon 70D. Not the newest or the best, but one I personally love and am comfortable with.

The lens added is the Tamron 70-300. Certainly not the best but it fits a range I need and really doesn’t have any other viable options. We have always had better results with Canon and Sigma lens. But the Tamron is here and though slow to focus has done the job in certain projects.

Young Heron, Testing - Click To Enlarge
Young Heron, Testing – Click To Enlarge

However… photographers should be careful  when updating a Tamron lens firmware. I knew it, but never thought to tell the firm cleaning it. Cameras and lens are just like a PC. Old PC’s don’t always work with new software. The same is true of this gear. Errors !!!!

After this second cleaning and calibration (the two together) I find things to be better. I still can’t use this combination for fast in flight, fast focus, but working slow can be done now.

Young Heron, Testing - Click To Enlarge
Young Heron, Testing – Click To Enlarge

When taking these shots I wanted to test a moving subject (not too fast), and a white bird. The white bird because getting feather details with this combination is important to me. I have used it with great success in the past shooting my Owl portraits. Those portraits have gotten us some great recognition and opportunities.

Based on these test images, and controlling errors to a minimum I’m comfortable with pushing the lens for a little while longer.

I guess it’s like upgrading a PC. If you don’t need it, don’t do it.

 

 

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