Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks - click to enlarge

No Effort In Flight, Wood Storks

They don’t twist and turn like the small birds but the move through the air with so little effort.

Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks - click to enlarge
Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks – click to enlarge

A wing span of 5 – 6 feet (1.8 m) certainly helps.

Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks - click to enlarge
Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks – click to enlarge

These birds were part of a flock taking advantage of a large pond when the water level was low.

Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks - click to enlarge
Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks – click to enlarge
Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks - click to enlarge
Big Acrobats In Flight, Wood Storks – click to enlarge

Many of the marshes and ponds in the managed wildlife areas are tied together through an old water trunk system (gates) originally used by rice plantations. The South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources lowers the water at times to help control vegetation and the water fowl feeding.

The storks found this during their population rebound and now make it home for a large part of the year.

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