A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge

A Different Kind Of Crypt

It is very difficult to walk past this burial crypt without taking photographs. The Egyptian influence of the late 1800’s is staring right at you, in an old marsh cemetery.

A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt – click to enlarge

Surrounded by palm trees and insects this is an adventure all by itself.

A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt – click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt – click to enlarge

An entrance rug, actually tile floor, is in front of the huge brass doors.

A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt – click to enlarge

Stairs and the entrance way is ornately carved stone. Stained glass windows provide a small amount of light, I did see a pane had broken.

A Different Kind Of Crypt - click to enlarge
A Different Kind Of Crypt – click to enlarge

The date 1894 is part of the brass doors.

The following obituary ran in the Columbia, SC newspaper;

‘Mr. Williams Burroughs Smith, the richest man In Charleston, died at his residence on Broad Street at 7 o’clock this morning. The name of W. B. Smith is one well known throughout the State. He was born In Charleston seventy-seven years ago, being the son of Robert Smyth, an obscure citizen.

Young Smith (or Smyth as he was then called—he changed his name subsequently, on account of some family affair) went into the cotton business at the age of fifteen with an old factor named Hatchins, who left Charleston subsequently. His next connection was with the firm of Jones &.Co., which became Jones & Smith, and finally Wm. B. Smith & Co. As a dealer in cotton and as a merchandise broker Mr. Smith was eminently successful. In early life he married, a Miss Jones, daughter of his partner.

Mr. Smith was for a long time president of the old Union Bank, and he managed its affairs as he did his own with a wonderful degree of acuteness. He turned every dollar that he made to account and fortune seemed to favor all of his investments. He gradually accumulated a large fortune which amounts to upwards of two and a half millions of dollars.

He leaves three daughters, the eldest of whom is the wife of Mr. A. H. Heyward. The second is the wife of Mr. W. B. Whaley, and third of the late I. K. Heyward. Between these three families, therefore, this large fortune will be divided. Mr. Smith has always led a very quiet and retired life and he never made any show of his wealth. He was at all times courteous in the extreme. Mr. Smith had been critically ill for some time and his end was not unexpected.

(From ‘The State’ newspaper, Columbia, SC, June 24, 1892)’

 

 

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