Burning, In A Marsh

A Marsh Burning

Even when it’s passed and burning further away, smoke is heavy and a completely unique smell. Thick, mixed odor of wood/leaves/damp.

Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh

Above an Alligator sits in a freshly burned area. You can see how some reeds are down to the earth, other parts dry but still standing.

The trees have burned leaves and branches, but they still stand and will grow even stronger. I am always surprised at what does, and doesn’t, completely burn.

Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh

Woods along the marsh edges are ash, or still burning, and again trees may be burned and still thrive later.

These are low fires started by the rangers to keep dense dried brush and flammable materials from becoming hazards. We have epic thunder, and lightening strikes too numerous to count in a storm. The first few for a ‘transplant’ is very interesting. My dog still quakes, and she’s almost deaf.

The other thing about managed burns is the roads, trails, and surrounding areas are not closed, at all.

Up north when anything happens (they don’t burn) there are police, barriers, flashing lights, the whole works. Regulations and government are ‘in your face’. Total opposite around here. We have driven by rangers, exchanged waves, as flames were going pretty high.

Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh

Most wildlife survive fires just fine. Weather and time of year is always considered. There will be fires with or without prescribed burns. Having them under control is much better than what we have seen in the US west coast.

Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh
Burning, In A Marsh

A last observation here is how long a fire can be active. We have gone past areas and seen things smolder over a week later. And conversely, watched a location spring back to life just as fast.

 

 

Leave Comments - Thank You

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.