ComingTee Plantation Ruins

ComingTee Plantation Ruins

This is one of the earliest plantations here and not very easy to find. A patchwork series of dirt roads brings you here. River transportation was used in the day.

Named after Captain Coming, who settled the land, as well as the T-shape made by the Cooper River’s east and west branches coming together here. 1669 is the earliest record.

ComingTee Plantation Ruins
ComingTee Plantation Ruins

John Coming gained land grants along the Cooper River, which brought him to South Carolina. He was mate of the pioneer ship Carolina, and later captain of the Blessing. He was married to a passenger on the Carolina, Affra Harleston.

ComingTee Plantation Ruins
ComingTee Plantation Ruins

At some point newer bricks were placed over the original. The buildings changed hands many times over the years, At one point being used by a large paper company.

ComingTee Plantation Ruins
ComingTee Plantation Ruins

ComingTee was not the only plantation grant back here. There was Hope plantation, Bonneau, and Strawberry. Click here for Strawberry Chapel. 

ComingTee Plantation Ruins
ComingTee Plantation Ruins

Tales of buried treasure surrounded this plantation for a long time. It actually turned out to be true.

When General Sherman of the US Union Army was marching through South Carolina towards Charleston the plantations were looted and burned. Strawberry Chapel was the small local church shared by all these far flung plantations. The silver cups and chalice from the chapel were hidden before the troops arrived.

It was thought the silver was brought to ComingTee for safe keeping, and promptly lost. This was 1865.

An old barn, in 1939, was searched and the treasure finally recovered. Now part is in the Museum Of Charleston, the rest used in twice yearly services in old Strawberry Chapel.

Wow, a real treasure story !!!

ComingTee Plantation Ruins
ComingTee Plantation Ruins

It took several trips back here to find the ruins, but no adventure should come easy.

4 thoughts on “ComingTee Plantation Ruins”

    1. Thank you. I had heard of this site from local historians. I am spending more time with Charleston locations lately. The ‘treasure’ was even more fascinating since I have been to, and photographed, all the places involved so long ago.

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