Full Speed Ahead, Egret

Full Speed Ahead, Egret

After digging around in the woods just behind this swamp it was a fast trip to the nest. He had a prize, the perfect twig.

Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret

I know it was the perfect twig because of the how long the search was.

Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret

In this sequence you can see how the bird started out low and climbed as he flew past. I panned the shots following the flight and now notice how the tree tops moved out of the scene as the Egret gained height.

Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret
Full Speed Ahead, Egret

Each year I forget how much practice I need to get these in flight sequences. It all comes back to me around mid January when the Herons come back to pick nest locations.

Man, the first shots each year are so very bad LOL.

7 thoughts on “Full Speed Ahead, Egret”

  1. Use it or lose it…temporarily. I found myself doing similar forgetful things being back on the beach after these quarantine times. 😊 nice series! Love watching any nest building.

    1. I hand hold everything. Rarely use a tripod. I used to carry a very lightweight 210 Sony lens that was okay just to identify birds. Been working out since I lost my job and now I can carry my full frame 200 for hours. Been pretty great. 😊 where is the rookery and is it public?

    2. I only use a monopod when days are cloudy and shooting at a distance, but a 600 gets heavy so do switch to a 400 once in a while.

      The rookery nearby is on land of an old plantation that opens for Charleston tourist visits. We walk there early or late and use back trails. The land there, and marshes along the river leading into Charleston is teeming with wildlife.

    3. I’d rather be on the back trails. Not into the tourist thing. If life ever gets safe again, we need to plan a trip up there.

    4. That’s just one of the places for wildlife. The coast of SC, just south of Charleston, is a maze of marshes. Some are in the tens of thousands of acres. Life and travel will return in some form you can be sure.

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