Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks

Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks

These were taken a few minutes after I was able to spot the Spoonbills flying up the marsh (click here to view the article). I had just attached my monopod so I could shoot a little slower.

Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks

They both have the same feeding habits, walk along while working the water. This is also about the maximum depth a Spoonbill will work.

Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks

Over the years scientists have discovered the Roseate Spoonbill is a good gauge on how well the health and flow of our waterways are. They track Spoonbill carefully around the Everglades. This bird was doing well, then almost extinct, all due to man changing the waters depth.

Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks
Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks

Both the Wood Stork and Spoonbill were endangered, and both learned to move into new places like the South Carolina Lowcountry to survive.

ACE Basin, South Carolina.

 

2 thoughts on “Spoonbill Joined Up With Wood Storks”

  1. Two of my favorites. The spoonbill looks like something from a gothic horror show. Saw my first ones last winter and fell in love.

    Like

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