Pon Pon Crumbles

Pon Pon Crumbles

Pon Pon means ‘a bend in the river’, a Yemassee Native American name for this area near the Edisto river.

In 1706 the Church of England authorized 10 parish, with small outlier Chapels Of Ease for distant plantations and the population. This is the remains of the Pon Pon (St. Bartholomew’s Parish) chapel. It has always been in the middle of nowhere.

The first chapel, and the settlements in the ACE Basin were burned during the 1715 Yamasee War.

Pon Pon Chapel is in Jacksonboro, South Carolina. It was located “on Parker’s Ferry Road, the busy stagecoach thoroughfare that connected Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia.” Today, Parker’s Ferry Road is a dirt road along the south side of a power line right of way, and the ruins of the chapel can be found along this road east of Jacksonboro Road (State Road S-15-40). It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. (Wikipedia) Good luck finding it.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

What is left now is even very different than my first visit just 6 years ago. In theory a renovation is in the future. Reality says we should photograph what is here, while it’s still here.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, preached in the wooden building twice on April 24, 1737. That chapel was been plundered and burned.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

The cemetery here had been active until sometime in the 1930’s I believe. Most graves still visible here are from the mid 1800’s.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

Hurricane Matthew did considerable damage on October 2017.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles
Note; These photographs were taken July 2022, I want to be sure the current date is included here since  these images are also being published by SCPictureProject an ongoing collection of historical records to preserve the history of South Carolina’s historic, natural, and cultural landmarks before they are lost to time.

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