Category Archives: Historical

Where’s The Water ?

The most famous, and photographed, spot in Charleston went down after Hurricane Irma. I saw no damage so I’m sure it was just in need of a cleaning.

Where's The Water - Click To Enlarge
Where’s The Water – Click To Enlarge

Water did breach the sea walls here.

Where's The Water - Click To Enlarge
Where’s The Water – Click To Enlarge

The Charleston fountains are kept incredibly clean, children are encouraged to climb in and play in all the fountains.

St. Philips, Charleston, South Carolina

Established in 1681, St. Philip’s is the oldest religious congregation in South Carolina.

St. Philips, Charleston, South Carolina - Click To Enlarge
St. Philips, Charleston, South Carolina – Click To Enlarge

The first St. Philip’s Church, a wooden building, was built between 1680 and 1681 at the corner of Broad and Meeting streets on the present day site of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church. It was damaged in a hurricane in 1710 and a new St. Phillip’s Church was begun a few blocks away on Church Street. After being delayed it was finished in 1723 but burned to the ground in 1835. Work on the present church was begun that same year and completed the next. The steeple was added between 1848 and 1850.

Along The Battery, Charleston, South Carolina

The Battery is a landmark defensive seawall and promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. Named for a civil-war coastal defense artillery battery at the site, it stretches along the lower shores of the Charleston peninsula, bordered by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, which meet here to form Charleston harbor.

Fort Sumter is visible from the Cooper River side (High Battery) and from the point, as are Castle Pinckney, the World War II aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-10), Fort Moultrie, and Sullivan’s Island. (Wikipedia)

Along The Battery, Charleston, South Carolina - Click To Enlarge
Along The Battery, Charleston, South Carolina – Click To Enlarge
Along The Battery, Charleston, South Carolina - Click To Enlarge
Along The Battery, Charleston, South Carolina – Click To Enlarge

I have had these 2 photographs for a few weeks now and it’s about time to publish them.

 

Charleston Single House

A Charleston single house (also called “half house”) is a form of house found in Charleston, South Carolina. The house is well-suited to long, narrow lots which were laid out in early Charleston.

Charleston Single House - Click To Enlarge
Charleston Single House – Click To Enlarge

A single house has its narrow side (often two- or three-bays wide) with a gable end along the street and a longer side (often five-bays) running perpendicular to the street (Wikipedia).

Charleston Single House - Click To Enlarge
Charleston Single House – Click To Enlarge

This style house is so popular around Charleston new developments have been designed around the ‘half house’.

Charleston, Working On Irma

A day before hurricane Irma Charleston, South Carolina, started the familiar ritual.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

We are a town of visitors and southern hospitality still rules, even while the doors are being sand bagged against the water.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

The doors remained open. Not only were there tourist still in some hotels, people evacuating from Florida came in. Which considering we are a peninsula, on the ocean, with a history of floods, surprised me.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

However, later in the day things were getting buttoned up.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

The fire department closed up everything they could, I think they’ve been here before. All the plywood is marked where it is to be attached. At least someone saved some from last time.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

These photographs were taken the day before the storm. Now, a day after, I’m not sure how much some of these little rows of sand bags worked.

Charleston, Working On Irma - Click To Enlarge
Charleston, Working On Irma – Click To Enlarge

I’ll need to wait until the water goes back out into the harbor to check the results.