Category Archives: Historical

A Working Pier

There is just something about the commercial piers that makes me swap out my gear and go for monochrome scenery images.

A true wildlife photographer panics when the ‘long, fast’ shot is taken away. But here you can get a little of everything interesting and maybe get that critter shot after all.

A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier

This is a shrimper pier. That means lots of rigging, and of course the Pelicans that own them.

A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier

Local history is never far away.

A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier
A Working Pier

 

Ann Bull Heyward – 1851

Found in the Bull family cemetery, Anglican chapel, St. Helena barrier island.

Ann Bull Heyward - 1851
Ann Bull Heyward – 1851

Both the Bull and Heyward families are found throughout Charleston and South Carolina history. In Charleston several of the larger manor houses were owned by family members. They were plantation owners here until the union army came up through Georgia.

Many barrier islands were abandoned ahead of the army’s arrival.

You never know what you may find out here.

The Man, Not Flag, Is The Story

Brig-General Ripley did just about anything a man of his time could do. He was a General in the southern CSA army, but that is just a piece. I have seen his grave site numerous times but never really researched him.

So…

The Man, Not Flag Is The Story
The Man, Not Flag Is The Story
  • Born in Worthington, Ohio, moved to New York when young
  • Attended West Point with  Ulysses S. Grant, William B. Franklin, Samuel G. French and Franklin Gardner.  Two served as prominent Generals in the Union Army, the other two Generals in the CSA.
  • Served in the Mexican American War in most every important battle. He later wrote 2 volumes of well known history of the war.
  • He was engaged in the Second Seminole War in Florida in 1849, where again he saw combat.
  • Served the US Army in Charleston SC, marrying into the families of Charleston, and the USA, founders.
  • From 1853–1854 he was the publisher of the Baltimore Daily American Times.
  • He directed the bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor on April 13, 1861 starting the US Civil War.
  • After the war, Ripley went abroad and resided in England for over twenty years.
  • In the late 1880’s he moved back to NYC where he died.
  • In 1887 he was buried in the (old) Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina.

These are just the highlights of his life.

He lived, worked, and fought wars all around the world… in the 1800’s.

 

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.

Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater

From an unscheduled stop at the old theater.

‘On February 12, 1736 the original Dock Street Theatre opened with a performance of George Farquhar’s play The Recruiting Officer. Built on the corner of Church Street and Dock Street (now known as Queen Street), the Historic Dock Street Theatre was the first building in America built exclusively to be used for theatrical performances. Flora, the first opera performance in America, took place at the Historic Dock Street Theatre.’   (Wikipedia)

Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater
Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater

The first building, and much of Charleston burned in 1740.

The current theater was originally the Planters Hotel, a hotel for plantation owners and traders. The upstairs bar originated the rum drink ‘Planters Punch’.

Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater
Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater

Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater
Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater

Plays are still performed through out the year. I have attended performances here and the quality is what you would expect from the oldest theater and group in the US. Besides, you are sitting in the middle of history all through the show.

Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater
Old Dock Street, Charleston Theater

Whenever going by and discover the doors are open we wander inside.

Dock Street Theater, French Quarter, Charleston.

Anglican Chapel, Black And White

Any time we pass an old Chapel of Ease we stop and take a few shots. I try to finish the photographs a little different. I even succeed once in a while.

Build in 1740, tabby construction, by local planters.

Anglican Chapel, Black And White
Anglican Chapel, Black And White
Anglican Chapel, Black And White
Anglican Chapel, Black And White
Anglican Chapel, Black And White
Anglican Chapel, Black And White