Category Archives: What I Saw

I Saw A Mountain, It Moved

I noticed 2 Alligators, around 5 feet (1.5 m), with a huge pile of black mud between them. Different enough to get a shot since it might be interesting.

It was.

I Saw A Mountain, It Moved
I Saw A Mountain, It Moved – click to enlarge

The mountain moved. To be precise the mountain turned and looked at me. So yes, it got interesting.

I Saw A Mountain, It Moved
I Saw A Mountain, It Moved – click to enlarge

Above is what I saw from a distance. His big ‘back end’ looked like dark mud.

Just an FYI for other photographers. If you have a camera that shoots fast continuous, like 10-12 a second, it’s louder than you think to wildlife. The ‘S’ option might come in handy around big guys like this. It is silent, just slower. I gamble, but that’s just me.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

This ‘super sized’ guy slipped away and I never did see him again.

A New Perspective

A place I have seen and photographed hundreds of times. If you visit this web site you too have seen it. (Click here to view a recent shot).

I don’t remember ever taking a photograph of that spot from one of the dikes.

A New Perspective -click to enlarge
A New Perspective -click to enlarge

Above was taken as I walked down the side of this marsh, actually it was a remote plantation rice field a few hundred years ago.

The island has a single (and shaky) dead tree. Here it is filled with Roseate Spoonbills and a Great Blue Heron. Another Heron is fishing in the shallows, and what  you can’t see is the scores Alligators in the marsh grass.

Scenes like this just reinforce how beautiful the Lowcountry wild lands are.

 

Heading Over, Alligator

This was taken on a day the dike was open. If the water is high it brings every Alligator for miles out to play.

Heading Over, Alligator - click to enlarge
Heading Over, Alligator – click to enlarge

Since I was standing directly on top of the open trunk (water gate) the photograph shows a very determined gator charging. Just not at me, the open gate right below.

I need to work through my photographs from that day, it was chaos.

Serious Fishing, Alligator

Taken at an open trunk in a dike. Fish were moving, and so were the Alligators. This is real competitive fishing.

Serious Fishing, Alligator - click to enlarge
Serious Fishing, Alligator – click to enlarge

The bigger the Alligator the closer they could get to the flowing water. Smaller Alligators held back, for obvious reasons.

Serious Fishing, Alligator - click to enlarge
Serious Fishing, Alligator – click to enlarge

And the last image is a ‘mistake’.

Serious Fishing, Alligator - click to enlarge
Serious Fishing, Alligator – click to enlarge

Wide shot with my foot. Basic 101…what not to do.

 

Smith Pyramid Mausoleum, Magnolia Cemetery

Smith Pyramid Mausoleum, Magnolia Cemetery - click to enlarge
Smith Pyramid Mausoleum, Magnolia Cemetery – click to enlarge

Victorian architecture included many designs and images with  Egyptian influence . It was the ‘rage’ of the times. Magnolia Cemetery is the resting place of Charleston elite and wealthy from that period so it makes sense there should be monuments like this.

Members of the Smith family (W.B. Smith the most wealthy person in Charleston) are interred here.

Parts of Magnolia are historically ornate like this, other sections simple carved stones, and others poor soldiers and sailors from the Confederate military.

A must visit place for photographers.

Alligators ‘May Live Here’

The standard South Carolina warning sign reads as follows ;

Alligators May Live Here

I even have a photo of it here, it is always bright yellow to be sure it can be seen.

You may also notice it is possible to walk across the water without getting your feet wet.

There 'May' Be Alligators - click to enlarge
There ‘May’ Be Alligators – click to enlarge

These large ‘stepping stones’ were discovering fish swimming through an open dike. In minutes the number tripled.

There 'May' Be Alligators - click to enlarge
There ‘May’ Be Alligators – click to enlarge

In a short amount of time I was able to shoot 6 feet (1.8 m) away from these large ones by standing on the wooden trunk.

As long as I stayed aware of the dirt bank on either side I had the perfect photography blind. None would climb the bank, the fish were down below.

Now I have 600 photographs to wade through.

 

Sepia Cemetery

Tall grass and broken branches are common in this cemetery. Sometimes the images from here almost look liked a staged studio shot. Perfect for monochrome or black and white work.

Sepia Cemetery - click to enlarge
Sepia Cemetery – click to enlarge

I shot this one spot several times using different angles and distances. In past years I would work with a smaller lens, portrait style. Now I use a zoom that gives me a huge range from true wide angle all the way to almost ‘super zoom’. It makes it easier, and I have many more options.

Sepia Cemetery - click to enlarge
Sepia Cemetery – click to enlarge

Both photographs are from the same location. Above was just closer and from a lower angle.