Category Archives: What I Saw

Night Heron, Last Night

This is night (evening really) in a swamp. Critters come out and the sounds get loud.

Night Heron, Last Night - click to enlarge
Night Heron, Last Night – click to enlarge

Above is a Yellow-crowned Night Heron coming out to hunt. Sitting in the Cypress trees he can see all around and still be safe from…you know who.

Just Knew He Was Going To Leave, Heron

I call this the ‘Leap Of Faith’. No second thoughts, a jump into space.

Just Knew He Was Going To Leave - click to enlarge
Just Knew He Was Going To Leave – click to enlarge

You can tell by their body language when they are almost ready. That doesn’t mean they always do, an educated guess really.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial

Ladies and gentlemen, the answer we have all waited for… how do they do it.

Our thanks to several locals who generously volunteered their time to provide us with  ‘A Visual Tutorial Of Walking On Turtles’.

Boy’s and girl’s please do not try this at home.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

The first step is to find an old wooden ramp covered in cannon ball sized turtles.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

Once the location is discovered the slow, use your whole body technique is best. A simple step and hug method keeps the original turtle in place.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

Next gently lift you left foot up and onto the turtle head. Again a slow forward motion. A 3 minute rest between turtle hops is standard procedure.

Repeat steps 2 and 3 as needed until complete control of the prime resting spot is attained.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view gallery and a step by step best practices method.

At the end of the journey any comfortable position should be available.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

No turtles were eaten during the creation of this tutorial.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage

One of the early arrivals.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge

The warmer weather has thrown the birds off a little so more could arrive any time now.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge

 

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff

One of the things I like about architectural photography is the different gear I get to ‘play’ with. And unlike wildlife photography it doesn’t weight a ton.

I keep a small drawstring bag in my kit with 2 lightweight lens. A 24mm and 50mm prime lens that can do most anything I need for this work.

Getting enough light inside these old houses is an issue. External flash units are prohibited. Prime lens open wider (faster) so light can be OK.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

Above is the top floor, in sepia, of a three story 1800’s spiral staircase. All the light was from a large set of windows on the right and the hall window straight ahead. The right window helped since I was shooting straight into the hall sun.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

 

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

Both back stairways were lit from a window. Shot with a Canon 24mm prime. On my Canon 7D2 that makes an equivalent lens of about a 36/37mm. A prime 35mm is a standard for street photography. So this works well here.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

The final lens I like to have is the old stand by Canon 18-135 kit lens, used above. If I did more of this work a Canon L series would replace it. This lens has always done well for me and is versatile so I don’t see a replacement any time soon.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

I believe the above was with the ‘nifty-fifty’, 50mm prime.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

And last, another room shot with the 24mm prime. Unlike the other rooms I had plenty of light to work with.

The various lens used here are specialty type for specific work but none are particularly expensive. Using small primes makes you think different about composition but they are always sharper than a typical zoom.

It’s digital, so I can take extra photographs, change my settings all around, and finally fix things in post process if I screw up. I even bring an old Canon 70D at times, it weighs less. That camera wants more light, but I can fix most things. It’s digital.

 

 

A Black And White Sitting Room

I am photographing the history, at least old buildings, of Charleston more lately.

A Black And White Sitting Room - click to enlarge
A Black And White Sitting Room – click to enlarge

Working like this is on the opposite end of the spectrum from wildlife.

Besides, it’s cleaner.