Category Archives: What I Saw

Spoonbills… Being Spoonbills

Spoonbills are just ‘goofy’ birds. And they do ‘goofy’ things.

Spoonbills... Being Spoonbills - click to enlarge
Spoonbills… Being Spoonbills – click to enlarge

They always climb on things. if there were 3 sticks, flat on the ground, they would be climbing all over them… I’ve seen it.

Spoonbills... Being Spoonbills - click to enlarge
Spoonbills… Being Spoonbills – click to enlarge

The following photographs show one that insists on standing on the very top. It doesn’t matter he can’t fit there. The other 2 look on and finally one just acts like he is laughing at the climber.

Click, or double tap, any image to view the gallery and antics.

Ultimately everyone found a spot to rest on.

Spoonbills... Being Spoonbills - click to enlarge
Spoonbills… Being Spoonbills – click to enlarge

Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots

The last few trips to the large marshes Eagles have been active. While we did miss the ultimate photograph (fishing so close the lens was too big, sneaking in from behind, etc.) I did grab a few worth saving.

Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots - click to enlarge
Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots – click to enlarge

As usual the tall reeds were not my friend. I caught this dive, then he disappeared into the marsh.

Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots - click to enlarge
Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots – click to enlarge
Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots - click to enlarge
Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots – click to enlarge

Low passes were plentiful this morning, blue sky over exposed more shots than I care to think of.

Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots - click to enlarge
Bald Eagle, Marsh Shots – click to enlarge

Above was a fun shot. This Eagle went low over everything else out there fishing. Ibis scattered while even the big Egrets and Herons took notice.

Wood Storks, well as expected, they didn’t flinch.

Eye Contact, Dolphin

He slowly moved past me, checking the shore in case of chasing fish here. This is common and I have wondered what they are thinking when we look right at each other.

Eye Contact, Dolphin - click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin – click to enlarge

Just as amazing is to watch a 1,400 lbs (635 kg) Dolphin gently slip under water and how they move it like it was solid matter.

Eye Contact, Dolphin - click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin – click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin - click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin – click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin - click to enlarge
Eye Contact, Dolphin – click to enlarge

When finally under there are nothing but small ripples. This is why it is so hard to see a Dolphin and figure where they might rise up again.

Look Of Fall, Wood Storks

This is one of those photographs that rarely come out the way you think they will. Flock of huge birds…fall colors…never will work.

I think here it did (to my happy surprise).

Look Of Fall, Wood Storks - click to enlarge
Look Of Fall, Wood Storks – click to enlarge

Absolutely one to click and view large.

Circus Tight Rope Walker, Spoonbill

I’ve seen and photographer these antics before, but they never get old. The feet of a Spoonbill was not made for walking around a tree. It looks to be hard work, and a balancing act not to fall off.

Circus Tight Rope Walker, Spoonbill - click to enlarge
Circus Tight Rope Walker, Spoonbill – click to enlarge

He just wanted to be on a branch a little more level. It took a lot of concentration to figure each individual step.

Circus Tight Rope Walker, Spoonbill - click to enlarge
Circus Tight Rope Walker, Spoonbill – click to enlarge

It’s funny considering they can jump off and take to the air with no thought at all.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

A Marsh Back Road

This article will ramble a bit, because that’s what I was doing when I decided to shoot this series.

All the photographs here are taken along a mile (1 k), or so, old marsh road. It was late in the day and we had no goal but to get out with our gear and stretch our legs close to home.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge

The marsh here is an old plantation rice field from the early 1800’s. A river, which is behind the tree line, feeds all the marshes from here to Charleston, South Carolina.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge

At one point the river turns close to the trail and is visible between the brush and trees. I may live here, but I certainly don’t have that view.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge

Canals run through here and wildlife, all kinds, use them like highways. Above a Moor Hen can be seen. They are the warning system around here. When they see a person it’s a loud scream and they walk on water to the nearest reeds. It’s really hard to sneak around here.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge

This is an easy walk, the road about 3 miles (5 k) in total and used once in a while with carts for cleanup.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge

I am never the only one out here. Above are 2 other locals (guess I’m a local I live here). An Anhinga dries out on an old ramp while a Great Blue Heron hunts from a clump of reeds. This day I bumped into 5 – 6 Heron, almost walked into 2 having a disagreement.

A Marsh Back Road - click to enlarge
A Marsh Back Road – click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

Above an Anhinga sat on an old pillion at the end of the road.

No particular subject matter in this article other than a few random photographs on a walk ‘around the neighborhood’.