Pushing Food, Pelicans

This is a good example of how a group of birds drive fish ahead, in this case into the banks of a rice field.

Pushing Food, Pelicans
Pushing Food, Pelicans

These Pelican swim forward grabbing the fish as they move.

Pushing Food, Pelicans
Pushing Food, Pelicans

The fish keep ahead of the birds until they run out of water or against a shore.

A friend was photographing large flocks of Egrets using the same technique. They were so efficient the fish jumped out of the water onto the banks all around where she was hiding in the reeds. Large flocks become an eating machine.

Click any image for a full view.

These flocks will move on when the fish are gone. The fish return with the tides and water flows between the marshes.

 

A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator

I could call these the lazy mans photographs. Unlike some of the other animals there are times Alligators are just there waiting for a camera (or so it seems).

A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator
A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator

What could be better on a cloudy, rainy day.

A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator
A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator

A simple but interesting critter accommodating me.

A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator
A Few Images Of Locals, Alligator

 

Down An Alley, Charleston

I can never do justice to this cemetery, especially with the subtle fall colors there.

It can be difficult to read some of the headstones given their age. I have found many names I recognize as the founders of the Charleston settlements.

Down An Alley, Charleston
Down An Alley, Charleston

All around the cemetery, even after you emerge from the alley, are old historical buildings. In the distance you can see the newer parts of town but even that doesn’t change the atmosphere here. You always feel enclosed, inside something old.

Down An Alley, Charleston
Down An Alley, Charleston

Taken at Jacobs Alley off King Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

 

Wood Storks In A New Location

It wasn’t that long ago the Wood Stork was on the endangered list. Their numbers were dropping and could find less and less suitable habitats.

Wood Storks IIn A New Location
Wood Storks IIn A New Location

There are still plenty of problems but the Wood Stork is a success story. They are off the endangered list and extending their breeding grounds.

Wood Storks IIn A New Location
Wood Storks IIn A New Location

Recently changes were made to old rice fields in Charleston’s Magnolia Plantation creating a better flow of water levels. Within a few months adult Wood Storks started to show up in the marshes.

The fact they are adults is important. Breeding season starts soon and rather than being south of us already they are still here. It might be another group will create a local rookery nearby.

Click any image above for full size views.

 

TPJ Photography