St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC

St. Philips Church was founded in 1681, around the same time as the Circular Congregational Church. Both are in the old city of Charleston South Carolina. Actually they share a back fence entrance.

The very small city cemetery is the resting place of an unusual number of US  historical figures. They include:

  • Charles Pinckney – signer of the US Constitution, a Senator, Congressman, Ambassador, and Governor.
  • Edward Rutledge – Signer Declaration Of Independence, member of the First and Second Continental Congress, a Congressman, and Senator.
  • John Calhoun – Vice President of US (twice), Congressman, Senator, Orator with Daniel Webster and Henry Clay.
St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC - Click To Enlarge
St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC – Click To Enlarge

The cemetery itself hardly covers a city block and has old buildings surrounding all sides.

St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC - Click To Enlarge
St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC – Click To Enlarge

While walking through I discovered many old stones laying against walls, buried with other headstones, and most unusual above ground burials (common in the southern US). A good example is the photograph below.

St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC - Click To Enlarge
St. Philips Church Graveyard Charleston SC – Click To Enlarge

What caught my eye was a carefully placed ‘bone’ on this marker. I checked… it was a  definitely a bone. I know placing rocks is common, a bone I don’t want to know. But yeah, I snapped this shot above real quick!

Note: I have tried to find any references to leaving a ‘bone’ (here it looked to be a shin / shank / cow) on a site. I could none, only info on stones. So, please it’s nothing evil, just ‘stuff you can’t make up’ again.

 

Night Time Fishing Pier

My usual photographs end after sunset. Here we stayed around a little longer and I think were rewarded for our efforts. The sun sat just under the horizon much longer than I had expected.

Night Time Fishing Pier - Click To Enlarge
Night Time Fishing Pier – Click To Enlarge

These were all taken hand held, we did not bring any tripods or even monopods. You can imagine how many shots were just awful.

Night Time Fishing Pier - Click To Enlarge
Night Time Fishing Pier – Click To Enlarge

I also was using my Canon 70D this day. It’s light weight and easy to carry. A great camera, however it is also not the camera to use for anything in low light.

Night Time Fishing Pier - Click To Enlarge
Night Time Fishing Pier – Click To Enlarge

Besides these images on the pier we were also able to capture a few more on the fishing boat side pier also. Again we had just enough light.

USS Laffey

The USS Laffey is a retired US Navy Destroyer. Commissioned in 1944 the ship served in WW II and was retired first in 1947, returned to duty in 1951, and finally decommissioned in 1975.

USS Laffey - Click To Enlarge
USS Laffey – Click To Enlarge
USS Laffey - Click To Enlarge
USS Laffey – Click To Enlarge

Click here for a complete history of this ship.

These images were taken in Charleston SC, where the USS Laffey is now part of Patriots Point and is docked along side the USS Yorktown.

Marsh Birds

Rather than have multiple articles for each photograph I have grouped 4 images together. Each a different bird, but all photographed around the same marsh.

Juvenile Little Blue Heron - Click To Enlarge
Juvenile Little Blue Heron – Click To Enlarge

The first is a young Little Blue Heron. Not blue at all. Every time I see one a book or on-line search is needed. For me the best clue is the green legs and feet, the long head feathers helps.

Anhinga - Click To Enlarge
Anhinga – Click To Enlarge

If I can get a close look at the wing feathers an Anhinga is easy to ID and not be confused with a Cormorant. When drying their wings the colors are really beautiful. The face, not so much. This one above would not move from his perch, so the photo is not very good.

Great Blue Heron - Click To Enlarge
Great Blue Heron – Click To Enlarge

Nothing looks like a Great Blue Heron. Besides, they’re just so tall you can’t confuse them with another bird.

White Ibis - Click To Enlarge
White Ibis – Click To Enlarge

And last the White Ibis. From a distance people confuse them with a small Snowy Egret. Up close that long curved bill gives them away. Young birds are dark but again, the curved bill ID’s them. I was surprised to find this one by itself. Usually they travel in small flocks.

 

TPJ Photography