Two Close Up Photos

South American Howler Monkey - Click To Enlarge
South American Howler Monkey – Click To Enlarge

I always try, if close enough, to get just a head shot of an animal I am photographing. Most of the time it doesn’t work out. Usually because by the time I get organized they have moved or are long gone.

Peccary - Click To Enlarge
Peccary – Click To Enlarge

When you do get one, no matter what the animal, the eyes make a story.

 

North American River Otter

Sorry, but all I can think about when looking at this guy is…. President Teddy Roosevelt. Chin sticking out and big ole mustache.

They almost look like a seal when they swim, twisting and flying under water.

North American River Otter - Click To Enlarge
North American River Otter – Click To Enlarge
North American River Otter - Click To Enlarge
North American River Otter – Click To Enlarge

They do live in New England, however I have never seen one in the wild. These shots were taken at Beardsley Park in Connecticut. They have a fairly large enclosed pond for a pair.

 

Westchester Center Cemetery – 1732

“As you are so were we”, “As we are you must be”

Timothy Bartholomue – June 16 1776

This is a variation of a quote used on headstones for over 200 hundred years. I have a version, shot with film 30 years ago , from a marker in Cape Cod dated 1853. I found one here recently also.

Westchester Center Cemetery - 1732 - Click To Enlarge
Westchester Center Cemetery – 1732 – Click To Enlarge

The original verse, a bit different due to changes in the English language, dates to 1376, on the tomb of Edward the dark prince of England. He was the first Duke Of Cornwall. Not highly thought of for a long time, hence the nice nick name.

Westchester Center Cemetery - 1732 - Click To Enlarge
Westchester Center Cemetery – 1732 – Click To Enlarge

There is something of a pull from these old cemeteries. I must have photographed 6 or 7 this summer alone.

Westchester Center Cemetery - 1732 - Click To Enlarge
Westchester Center Cemetery – 1732 – Click To Enlarge

No matter how many photographs I take, rarely are they processed in color. Even here I dropped the exposure down significantly on the ones I did use as color.

Come winter, white snow, I may revisit a few to see how they photograph with snow and the minimal color left.

 

 

Osprey Dive Hard

The actual Osprey dive is shown below, but I thought the real action was as it hit the water. Hard and loud. I selected that as the page featured photograph.

Osprey dive from between 30 to 100 feet, straight down.

Diving Osprey - Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey – Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey - Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey – Click To Enlarge

Their 6 foot wing span helps lift them from the water, yet I have seen them float for a few minutes as if catching their breath from the crash landing.

Diving Osprey - Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey – Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey - Click To Enlarge
Diving Osprey – Click To Enlarge

It’s never easy to photograph this but so rewarding when you manage it.

 

Flocking Swans

At last count by Connecticut Environmental Protection there were approximately 1400 Mute Swans in Connecticut. By my count they were all in the Connecticut River, North Cove, today.

Connecticut Swans - Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans – Click To Enlarge

Swans don’t migrate which makes me wonder why there were so many together. It’s even more surprising since they have such a poor attitude.

Connecticut Swans - Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans – Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans - Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans – Click To Enlarge

At one point I heard what sounded like hammering, a construction site almost. No, just another disagreement out on the water.

Connecticut Swans - Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans – Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans - Click To Enlarge
Connecticut Swans – Click To Enlarge

With this many Swans in the cove I was surprised to see kayaks on the water. Swan attacks on kayaks are common. So, 2 kayaks and 1400 Swans (6 foot wing spans). Now that would be a photo opp!

 

30 Minute Magic

These were taken at dawn, in a 30 minute period on the Connecticut river.  Something different appears in each, and then is gone in the next.  I’m just the photographer, not the magician.

As the light changed, the fog rolled in, and each photograph takes a new look.

Please Click To Enlarge To View Full Image

Dawn Fog Connecticut River - Click For Full View
Dawn Fog Connecticut River – Click For Full View

The first shot here had early pre-dawn light. Thick fog appeared rolling in and over the woods, mist rising from the river. A day later I noticed the Osprey hidden on the dead branch (left side).

Dawn Fog Connecticut River - Click For Full View
Dawn Fog Connecticut River – Click For Full View

Moments later, a wide angle photo, no Osprey. The light now began reflections on the water.

Dawn Fog Connecticut River - Click For Full View
Dawn Fog Connecticut River – Click For Full View

Next a little more light and less color. The fog appeared thicker. I think it was the light. Ripples made for less reflections.

Dawn Fog Connecticut River - Click For Full View
Dawn Fog Connecticut River – Click For Full View

This is a few minutes later when the sun was just moving above the horizon. Again no Osprey can be found. I never did see him at all. With more light the trees appeared through the fog.

Dawn Fog Connecticut River - Click For Full View
Dawn Fog Connecticut River – Click For Full View

Finally I packed up the camera, tripod, and the bag of stuff I didn’t need and moved about 50 yards up river. The light hit and geese swam out from the shore. No Osprey but a dozen geese from the same spot.

All this within a 30 minute time frame. And….. the coffee was still hot when we got home.

 

 

Great Blue Heron In The Cove

It’s September,  in a short time the Herons will be hard to find.  At this point we should be photographing as many as we can.

Great Blue Heron - Click To Enlarge
Great Blue Heron – Click To Enlarge

The birds in this series are not the same. One of these will likely move a few miles down river and stay here for the winter. The other two will go south.

Great Blue Heron - Click To Enlarge
Great Blue Heron – Click To Enlarge

Comparing birds the last one, photo above, would be my choice as to who stays.

The largest Blue Herons are in New England. The bigger the bird the more likely they are to stay here for the winter.

I read that on the internet so it must be true.

TPJ Photography