Tag Archives: Bird Photography

We Needed Some Pink

Lately everything published has been from a swamp, and Great Blues. Time for a different color on the web site.

Pink of course.

Below is a Spoonbill gliding by us heading to some larger flocks.

We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink

Keeping the Roseate Spoonbill tradition alive, the bird takes his spot from the middle.

We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink

A few looked his way, but not being a true crash meant none of the others cared.

BTW, in a few shots here you can see the hidden orange color found on a breeding age adult.

 

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

She swam right up to log almost directly below me.

After she struggled to climb up, this is the look of surprise when she looked up.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

When they are really wet not only can’t they fly, it’s hard to even get out of the water.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

She wants to get dry as soon as possible, shaking off helps.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

In the middle of the shake she spots me looking down at her.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

It was too late and I must not have been very dangerous looking since she sat there dripping.

Female Anhinga, Charleston, South Carolina.

Checking Out A Rookery, Heron

This is another yearly occurrence. A Great Blue arrives and doesn’t appear to know his way around. It might be a young first year breeder or even from a different rookery.

After circling a bit he made his first landing high up.

Checking Out A Rookery, Heron
Checking Out A Rookery, Heron

Several new comers have been around. Some watch to see how things work, others just blunder through the trees and nests.

It’s much safer for the new ones to observe for a while.

Under Massive Live Oaks

I shot this trying to make the Great Egret stand out against the dark background. Not my usual swamp/marsh scene.

Under Massive Live Oaks
Under Massive Live Oaks

After looking at the shots I realized just how big the trunk and roots of this old Oak were.

Typical open-grown trees reach 20 meters (65.5 feet) in height, with a limb spread of nearly 27 meters (88.5 feet). Their lower limbs often sweep down towards the ground before curving up again.

These are slow growing trees but easily live several hundreds years,

Under Massive Live Oaks
Under Massive Live Oaks

Spanish Moss mostly grows on these trees also.

Where Have You Been !

In this series a male did bring back a stick, but she didn’t want to take it.

She may have waited too long for such a tiny gift.

Where Have You Been !
Where Have You Been !
Where Have You Been !
Where Have You Been !

Above you can see it wasn’t all that impressive.

Where Have You Been !
Where Have You Been !

The last shot looks like she may have ultimately taken it.

Where Have You Been !
Where Have You Been !