Tag Archives: Bird Photography

Unwelcome Visitor, Again

An ongoing story here. In this rookery a new comer has been trying to ‘skip the hard work’ part. He had been landing on nests, getting aggressive with females, and over all causing trouble.

Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again

In this series I captured him (on the right) invading a nest site, again.

Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again

At first the female sat back, maybe intimidated by the male. But this being her nest she confronted him.

Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again

Things got louder and it became an actual fight not just posturing.

Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again
Unwelcome Visitor, Again

At the end here you can see she has pushed him back and off the nest itself.

Most of the times confrontations are all noise. But being predators sometimes it quickly turns and if one does not back down (like above) it’s not pretty.

Calling For A Lady

This guy was working it ! He also did a bow, even started to snap his bill loud and hard. Looking for a lady for sure.

Click the image below and you will see he was even staring at me LOL.

Calling For A Lady
Calling For A Lady

Now, there’s more to the story. On the bottom of this same Cypress is an unattached female. She was completely ignoring him.

Calling For A Lady
Calling For A Lady

He gave it his best, but last I saw he was still single.

Egret On A Dike

Spotted this Great Egret on the edge of a dike, actually almost on top of an old wooden trunk.

Directly below the bird is the edge of a salt marsh. It’s tidal so at low tide all types of edible critters are in the mud. The dike is a perfect place to look around below.

Egret On A Dike
Egret On A Dike

The Ocean is probably 15+ miles away but the tide still works this far inland.

That’s why this is called the Lowcountry, we are low…like sea level low.

Egret On A Dike
Egret On A Dike

Following The Great Blue Exit

This is the type of series I love to catch. I don’t get the full start to finish often like this one.

The ‘tell’ for Herons and Egrets is the lean and bent knee. When I see it likely it is the start of taking flight, like this one.

Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit

Below I was focused on the bird, who was watching an Egret he had just chased. Hand holding a big lens means there isn’t a long time for me to focus and wait. It gets heavy, the lens begins to shake, and I need a rest.

Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit

My arm had not ‘fallen off’ yet so I was able to get this sequence.

Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit
Following The Great Blue Exit

And then he was quickly off across the marsh following the Great Egret.

 

Spotted Something

Taken from the top of a dike dirt road. Some dikes are large enough to have a single lane road, this being one that separates salt marsh from old rice fields. Pretty much an environment with a little bit of everything.

Spotted Something
Spotted Something

The Great Blue heard and saw something over the side of the dike. He waited patiently but nothing else happened.

We Needed Some Pink

Lately everything published has been from a swamp, and Great Blues. Time for a different color on the web site.

Pink of course.

Below is a Spoonbill gliding by us heading to some larger flocks.

We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink

Keeping the Roseate Spoonbill tradition alive, the bird takes his spot from the middle.

We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink
We Needed Some Pink

A few looked his way, but not being a true crash meant none of the others cared.

BTW, in a few shots here you can see the hidden orange color found on a breeding age adult.

 

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

She swam right up to log almost directly below me.

After she struggled to climb up, this is the look of surprise when she looked up.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

When they are really wet not only can’t they fly, it’s hard to even get out of the water.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

She wants to get dry as soon as possible, shaking off helps.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

In the middle of the shake she spots me looking down at her.

Surprised To See Me, Anhinga
Surprised To See Me, Anhinga

It was too late and I must not have been very dangerous looking since she sat there dripping.

Female Anhinga, Charleston, South Carolina.