Tag Archives: The Connecticut shore

Dreary Snowy Egret

This is another one of those photographs where ‘technically’ the subject, Egret, should have taken up more space in the image.

Dreary Snowy Egret - Click To Enlarge
Dreary Snowy Egret – Click To Enlarge

The Egret itself is sharp and crisp in the image so cropping would have been no problem.

I processed for a 16×9 print, landscape, to take advantage of the reeds in the fore and general brown bokeh in the balance of the photograph.

It seemed to me both the bird and the windy brown marsh were important to the image. At the end of the day it’s just an Egret picture not a Monet.

Eolia, Harkness Mansion

I have photographed this location numerous times. There are usually people walking around so when I get time to visit during the week I take advantage of it.

Eolia - Click To Enlarge
Eolia – Click To Enlarge

It’s a beautiful building with a sweeping lawn that leads to the shore and a rocky coast line.

Aeolus was the greek god of the winds and that is where the building got it’s name. And yes, always windy here, never change a lens in the open!

Eolia - Click To Enlarge
Eolia – Click To Enlarge
Eolia - Click To Enlarge
Eolia – Click To Enlarge

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

These photos were taken while the Night-Heron nests were under siege by a flock of crows

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - Click To Enlarge
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron – Click To Enlarge

The crows kept their distance, maybe because of the posturing from the birds. The certainly looked bigger than they actually were.

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - Click To Enlarge
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron – Click To Enlarge

20160414-1O2A8841

The crows never did leave so this could have been a long stand off for both sides.

Watch Where You Walk – Piping Plover

When out walking with a camera I look up and around, rarely down. This little guy only looked down, not up. It could have ended badly.

Piping Plover - Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover – Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover - Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover – Click To Enlarge

There was no warning of tiny birds since this one was all alone. No other small birds were anywhere near.

Piping Plover - Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover – Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover - Click To Enlarge
Piping Plover – Click To Enlarge

I know they are small but for perspective here look at the little shells around him.

All was good after we spotted each other. A few shots and we both went our way.

Monochrome New London Light

It’s impossible to get a unique photograph of the New London Light. These 2 were taken at Avery Point. I was surprised to see only 2 other people photographing the light while I was there.

Monochrome New London Light - Click To Enlarge
Monochrome New London Light – Click To Enlarge

Best I could do was shoot on a raining cloudy day, and process as a monochrome photo.

Framed prints, unframed prints, and specialty canvas, aluminum and acrylic prints are available for purchase at our online gallery.

 

UConn Sailing, In December Of Course

In the USA when people hear ‘UConn’ (University Of Connecticut) basketball is the next word. It’s the accepted answer to a word association game (the best selling T-Shirt at the women’s championships is always “Anybody But UConn”).

UConn Sailing - Click To Enlarge
UConn Sailing – Click To Enlarge

Being a New England school they take sailing pretty serious too. They must since this was taken a few days before Christmas.

UConn Sailing - Click To Enlarge
UConn Sailing – Click To Enlarge

The weather has been warm, but really!

I stood on some rocks, on shore, with hood, gloves, and some tissues.

Classic New London Light Photograph

Classic New London Light - Click To Enlarge
Classic New London Light – Click To Enlarge

The New London Light is one of the most photographed lighthouses in the country. While it sits right at the harbor entrance there are actually 3 separate lights in use here.

The coast line is rocky and the open water here is known for it’s dangerous ‘race’ (a strong rapid current flowing through a narrow channel in the sea).

A little interesting fact is that many of the New England lighthouses are privately owned. The US Coast Guard has been selling them to historic organizations or even individuals. The light must be leased back to the US who will maintain the mechanics.

The 3 New London lighthouses (New London Light, Ledge Light, and Race Rock Light) are owned by a preservation organization and maintained by volunteers….. many of them are local photographers!