Eagles Make An Appearance

Eagles Make An Appearance

With all the activity in the marshes now it was only a matter of time until we bumped into Bald Eagles. They are always around, we even know where they will be watching us from.

However, getting action shots is all about timing. It takes an Eagle a few minutes to move in, get prey, and leave. Being in the right spot here takes luck too.

Below, a quick grab and he’s gone.

Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance

But the low water means they need a new plan, not just swoop down out of their pine tree.  The Eagle above might have even been confused. He was standing where he was fishing just the other day.

Eagles Make An Appearance

Eagles Make An AppearanceA juvenile (above) also landed, but he just watched the adults.

Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance
Eagles Make An Appearance

Eventually they all reverted back to normal, left us standing there while they flew off.

ACE Basin, South Carolina.

12 thoughts on “Eagles Make An Appearance”

  1. Wonderful shots of the eagles, Ted. It is nice to see the eagles fishing for their own food and not trying to steal it from other birds. 🙂

    1. Yikes! In Maryland here is a place called Conowingo Dam on the the lower Susquehanna River. Throughout the year, fish on the upriver side of the dam are killed or stunned as they are sucked through 10 generators in the nearly mile-long dam. As a result bald eagles (and photographers) often gather there, particularly in the fall and in the winter.

    2. I almost went once, then saw a photo of a mass of cameras 😂😂.

      This was a pretty drastic change of water in all our big marshes. Since miles are interconnected they drained a huge number, all at the same time. Animals of every species and shape came to eat. They always drain areas, this was just a massive one.

      By lowering water breeding birds have food, plant life rejuvenates, even certain specific grasses are considered to allow them to seed, which is then spread when water returns. Alligators get a little crazy (photos coming) but the end result has always been a good control on the marshes. Parts here have had this done yearly since the 1700’s. Guess it works. 👍

    3. I too have avoided Conowingo, because of crowds. I was fascinated to read that on busy days you are likely to have over a million dollars worth of camera gear, with dozens, if not hundreds of expensive long lenses. It is interesting to read of the way that marshes are managed there, Ted. In our area, they have controlled burns at some parks to maintain certain habitats and to keep them from being overrun with vegetation. As you said regarding the marshes, it seems to work.

    4. 😁, I would bet they warn people when burning though 🤣🤣. Down here, we have burns too. Usually we smell smoke or see flames. 😂. We, and others I know, have driven right down the middle of them LOL Not much else you can do especially when a burn here is thousands of acres.

    5. Yikes. Our burns are much smaller and controlled. Since we are in a suburban area, they give warnings and do only small areas at a time.

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