Tag Archives: Fall

On A Mission, Bald Eagle

I watched the Eagle pass me over the marsh, then lost him behind a nearby tree.

I looked over but he never came out the other side. I finally spotted him turn and go into his dive.

On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle

I knew he had a reason, and he was diving to the far side of this rice field. Could be worse though, he might have flew off.

On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle

He must have spotted some fish because he pulled up low passing over the water.

On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle

The shadows covered those huge talons from a good shot, but he was reaching out.

On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle

Made the grab and as usual kept the same speed.

On A Mission, Bald Eagle
On A Mission, Bald Eagle

You can see it was a small fish still a pretty good catch I though.

Click here to see just how big their talons are from a previous article.

Bald Eagle, ACE Basin.

Pelicans, Fall Colors

The fall colors associated with the northern US came to the ACE Basin this year. Well, in a few spots with the right trees.

Along the back end of this particular marsh we had vivid reds for a week or so. Combine that with big White Pelicans and you get some nice images.

Pelicans, Fall Colors
Pelicans, Fall Colors
Pelicans, Fall Colors
Pelicans, Fall Colors

A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene

This is the marsh scene we always want to capture, but have no control over. The scenery, and all the locals, have to play their part in this.

A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene
A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene

The obvious players are the two Alligators swimming through, as well as the fishing Great Blue Herons.

If you view this full size you can see a Night Heron in the air. The far back of the marsh, along the waters edge has small figures. These are most likely a hundred American Black Ducks.

An amazing sight.

Donnelley, South Carolina.

 

Turkey Trot, Literally

Usually I just get some fast Turkey butts charging off into the woods. And of course they are always in the shadows.

Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally

In this case yes they did run into the woods, but at least they ran past first. Most shots were still in the shadows though.

Turkey Trot, Literally
Turkey Trot, Literally

Considering these ladies were running in the shadows I’m happy to get more than a blur.

 

Scenes From Walking A Dike

We were following the sightings of lots of birds. I carried my usual long lens gear, plus a backup with short lens, my monopod, and a gear bag. Never do this if above the age of 25. Besides you can’t sneak up on anything, you have become like a traveling circus.

Anyway, I really wanted to grab a few images of this long dike and what we see. This connects (below) with 3 other dikes and marshes.

The first photograph is a good example of how using trunks (gates) moves water between marshes.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

There is a wooden rectangular box inside the dike with the gates on either side. A few hundred years ago that would have been a large hollow log. Same basic design from 1600’s until now. These shots are a month old, nothing changes.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

Above is looking back to where we had started, the trunk being behind me now. Both images taken from the same spot. Thankfully the center had been recently cut.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

A little further on is an area wide open for miles. At times filled with birds, others like this day not much happening. There was a breeze, bigger birds tend to avoid openings like this with wind.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

This day we turned back and walked the same route. With all the dikes connecting here we have multiple options for a return to where we left the car. Which of course is on another dike.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

These photographs were taken at Bear Island, a wildlife management area. The dikes shown here and the roads entering the area are now closed until mid February. Bear is one of the largest locations for migratory birds in the U.S., with a few exceptions this is a safe place for large water fowl.

 

Stork, Up From The Cane

This worked out well. Walked down a dike further out than I had been lately since reeds and cane blocked both sides of the trail. Too thick to see anything a friend and I were only watching straight ahead.

So of course up pops an adult Stork from behind. We had gone right past him.

Stork Up From The Cane
Stork Up From The Cane

He choose to go straight giving me a chance at a few shoots before the tall reeds blocked us again.

Stork Up From The Cane
Stork Up From The Cane

He changed his mind again though and turned heading back to where we had just come from.

Stork Up From The Cane
Stork Up From The Cane
Stork Up From The Cane
Stork Up From The Cane

I watched for a while and yes, he flew and landed exactly where we had been standing way down the other side. Of course he came down next to Ellen.