Tag Archives: Historical

St. Andrews 1706

Old St. Andrews Parish Church was one of the ten original Anglican parishes set in 1706. Prior to the American Revolution the church was a first parish of the Church Of England.

The parish was the main house of worship in a given area, sanctioned by the Church of England (King), with small Chapels of Ease in the outlying plantation areas. There are 20 published posts on this site with various chapels, search for ‘Chapel of Ease’.

St. Andrews 1706
St. Andrews 1706

St. Andrews is in Charleston, on what is called plantation row. Several of the first, and largest, plantations are on the same road, along the Ashley River.

This was the parish for all the large plantations.

St. Andrews 1706
St. Andrews 1706

Living not far from here we have passed by St. Andrews for years, it’s always a comment how we need to stop in.

The spring flowers bloomed, pulling Ellen in like a magnet.

St. Andrews 1706
St. Andrews 1706

Charleston, South Carolina.

Manigault House, B&W

We live in the Lowcountry now because of the enormous number of wildlife photography opportunities here. The town of Charleston has entirely different options available also, historical sites. More than I had ever known before moving in.

The following monochrome images are from one of the old homes we like to stop by. Around here you can walk down any street and discover one. Built in 1803 by Joseph Manigault it is one of many historical locations owned by local preservation groups.

Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W

Above is the foyer, main entrance to the house. Many of these houses have intricate staircases, plaster moldings, and swooping windows. Impressing visits, showing off wealth, as they arrived was a contest between the wealthy in this town.

Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W
Manigault House, B&W

Another show of wealth was in the dining and sitting areas. European silver, dinner settings, and even furniture was imported. Charleston was the wealthiest city in the new US and the traders and planters bought anything they could find.

Life finally did crash in 1861, the start of the US Civil War.

Inside Fort Clinch (Part 2)

These are from our second visit to Fort Clinch an 1800’s coastal military fortification in Florida.

My first trip there was during the pandemic. We were able to walk the walls but all the interior was locked. This time the doors were open and like before almost no other people around.

The photographs below were taken in the officers and enlisted men’s living quarters.

The finished photographs were processed using a film simulation software. This is a little different than other filters I have used for 35mm film. The images are completed using a historical timeline, by date, of cameras and methods available within a time frame. Now to be fair… I wasn’t around then… I’m not that old. But the software displayed samples and these looked close to mid 1800’s.

Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch

Above is the fireplace mantle in the officers quarters. Commanding officers photographs were hung on display.

Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch

The sleeping quarters were built into the walls of the fort.

Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch

I think this interior room was the officers mess.

Inside Fort Clinch
Inside Fort Clinch

All the structures were built of brick and steel. The walls were actually two structures and partly built into the coastal sand dunes.

Another article I hope to publish was taken inside the enlisted men’s shared rooms.

Click here to view the previous article.

At Mantanzas

Taken at the Inlet where the Mantanzas River meets the ocean. A thin stretch of beach runs along the coast.

As you can see from the first images the vegetation is fairly thick but it’s not very deep and easily accessible. The bugs will feast, nothing new there.

At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas

This is a spot filled with history dating back to the 1500’s when the land was occupied by Spain. France had troops in what was then Fort Carolina (Duval County Florida). Conflict was between Catholic Spain and Huguenot France.

The word Mantanzas means slaughters in Spanish. Without the details the Spanish took control here and next Fort Carolina.

At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas

Above, built in 1742, is Fort Mantanzas. This was a Spanish garrison to protect St. Augustine just a little further south.

Below is an explorer wandering through the inlet. Ellen with the ever present floppy hat and cameras.

At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas

As expected. A few locals.

At Mantanzas
At Mantanzas

Black And White, Getting Light Inside Old Military Post

For a change of pace on the web site I have published these photographs taken inside an 1800s coastal military installation.

Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post

I had missed getting inside the actual buildings and walls the first time we came by Fort Clinch Florida last year. Covid closing.

There is a theme to these images that came about half way through my wandering.

Light, and not through windows, was an obvious problem since all the living quarters (not inside the walls and tunnels) had interesting oil lamps, candles, and lanterns. I made sure to make them a key focal point of many photographs just since they were interesting.

Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post

Above, oil lamps hung all through the brick rooms. I had never seen any like these.

Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post

Traditional kerosene lamps hung from walls, doors, and on tables and were the most common. Living in hurricane land we still have and use them.

Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post
Getting Light Inside Old Military Post

Of course candles were also in every room and entry point.

Shooting historical buildings and sites always gives me a great excuse to fall back into the old black and white photography.

As usual I got carried away shooting here and now still have additional buildings to review and all the inside walls soldiers used as part of this old fortress.

 

Kingsley Plantation 1817

Kingsley Plantation, along the St. John’s River, Florida. Purchased and completed around 1817 in what was then Spanish Florida.

Kingsley Plantation 1817
Kingsley Plantation 1817

Zephaniah Kingsley owned several plantations in the area during the time of Spanish rule. And no, not the Hollywood version of what the main house should look like.

Kingsley Plantation 1817
Kingsley Plantation 1817

Kingsley was married to a former enslaved woman named Anna Madgigine Jai. She ran the farms for her husband.

Kingsley Plantation 1817
Kingsley Plantation 1817

In 1821 the US purchased the territory of Florida and brought their rules of slavery with them.

Kingsley sent his wife, children, and former enslaved people to his plantation in Haiti where slavery was illegal. In 1839 all the Kingsley US properties were sold, the family members now living in Haiti with the exception of two married daughters to Florida plantation owners.

Kingsley Plantation 1817
Kingsley Plantation 1817

Kingsley Plantation is now owned by the US Parks Dept.

Views Of Fort Clinch – 1847 (part 1)

This was the second time time I had visited the ocean facing fort in Florida. It has scenes and subjects that make for great, interesting, photographs.

Started in 1847 the structure is completely brick, built into the dunes of the Florida shore.

Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch

The fort was built to protect the St. Mary and Amelia river access. During the War Of 1812 (more coming) the British navy used the US rivers as they wanted, which of course caused all sorts of problems given that we were at war… again.

Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch

When I found the connection to the 1812 War I decided to dig into it for a little info. For none US readers the War Of 1812 is a ‘Oh By The Way’ footnote in the countries history. I’ve always loved history and it is hardly mentioned.

Now I get it. Fast forward to today and it makes as much sense, has as many differing opinions, and diverse players imaginable. There seems to be ‘fake news’ as well.

Players included the new USA, Britain, what is now Canada, every Native American tribe picked a side, and France as well as Spain joined in. For additional confusion click here.

Below, back to Fort Clinch.

Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch

So, 1812 caused this to be built, it has been occupied by different armies, never a shot fired. As you can see this is a hot, sandy, wind blown, desolate location (then).

Views Of Fort Clinch
Views Of Fort Clinch

When the structure of the fort was fully renovated they completed the inside wall tunnels and living /storage areas. Sometimes inside renovations and presentations like this can be ‘corny’ but not here.

At this site the period furnishings are simple, and great to photograph. As I dig through the images additional images will be published.