Tag Archives: Historical

Charleston, Joseph Manigault

Built in 1803 Joseph Manigault’s home had a theme common to all the Charleston manor houses. It simply said ‘I have money’. Charleston was the wealthiest city in the country, the planters and traders  couldn’t spend fast enough.

The big houses made sure the entrance was bigger and better than their neighbors. Spiral designed stairs, free standing, were the center piece. Here we also had a crystal chandelier to add some sparkle.

Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault

This old home is one of my favorites so we visit here yearly. Each time there is something else that catches my eye. The houses were designed with huge windows for light. Each season during the year things are captured a little different.

Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault

The month of January there are less visitors and special passes are available to many of the historical buildings. We have photographed a few lately and may get one more day in this month.

Joseph Manigault house, Meeting Street, South Carolina.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The church is one of the oldest in Charleston. Like several others in town the congregation was formed when the original church could no longer support the growth. The First (Scotts) church is close to the harbor, this building is on what was considered the far end of Charleston.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

I had never been in the grave yard before. maybe the gates are usually locked. Compared to the local churches the burial area is small.

Many of the headstones were dated just a few years before the start of the US civil war. During the war minimal damaged occurred this far up the peninsular. Ships canon could not reach up here. However, during the federal troop occupation later on nothing was completely spared.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The black and white photographs were done a little different than my usual method. Here I used DxO Filmpack with a 35mm Delta film filter as the base conversion and modified to be a bit softer. I had forgotten how ‘rough’ Delta film actually was.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

Second Presbyterian Church, Meeting Street, Charleston.

Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston

Fifteen men began planning for Second Presbyterian Church in 1809. The Reverend Andrew Flinn organized the congregation to accommodate the growing congregation at First (Scots) Presbyterian Church on lower Meeting Street. The new church was built at 342 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina at the then substantial cost of $100,000, and on April 3, 1811, it was dedicated as “The Second Presbyterian Church of Charleston and Its Suburbs.” (Wikipedia)

Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston

Unusual for Charleston the church is set back from the street, a small park stands in front. Because the church is in ‘upper’ Charleston more land was available at the time.

Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston

The building survived the civil war better than most. The canon of the day could not reach here from the ship blockade.

This is the first time I have visited in a while since there was a fire in the spire. Repairs had the church surrounded by scaffolds for at least two years.

Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston
Second Presbyterian Church, Charleston

This church building is the fourth oldest church in town.

Second Presbyterian Church, Meeting Street, Charleston.

In A Court Yard, Charleston

Out and around town looking for new ideas, maybe web site changes.

In A Court Yard, Charleston
In A Court Yard, Charleston

Photographs taken behind one of the old, and not renovated, homes from the 1800’s.

In A Court Yard, Charleston
In A Court Yard, Charleston
In A Court Yard, Charleston
In A Court Yard, Charleston

Forced myself to use a prime lens. No zoom I actually had to move my feet…what a concept!

Entering Drayton Hall, Charleston

Drayton Hall is the only plantation house on the Ashley River ‘plantation row’ to survive intact through both the Revolutionary and Civil wars, it is a National Historic Landmark. The river was the highway between the original 1600’s rice plantations and wealthy Charleston, South Carolina.

While very rural at the time the homes were designed, and built, like Renaissance architect, only better. Rice was like gold for centuries.

Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston

The entrances of plantations, like the grand manors in Charleston, were meant to immediately impress visitors. Actually many of the Charleston manors were owned by the plantations.

Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston

The details are incredible. Even more so when you consider they are from the era of 1600 – 1700.

Unfortunately the second floor here is closed for maintenance. Vibrations from the floor above are damaging the plaster design ceilings. It turns out the original design had a flaw, not enough open space between the wooden floors and plaster work. It only took 300 years for the damage to start.

Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston
Drayton Hall, Charleston

A few more trips are needed to photograph the back room details. We do have access to the building and live nearby. Light and weather are the main consideration.

Best viewed large, the house is very impressive.

Drayton Hall, Ashley River, Charleston, South Carolina.

Inside Drayton Hall Plantation

Drayton  the only plantation house on the Ashley River to survive intact through both the Revolutionary and Civil wars. The other main Charleston plantations a few miles upriver did not escape major damage.

The mansion was built for John Drayton starting around 1738. He was the third son of the Drayton family and would never inherit the family home of Magnolia Plantation 3 miles away.

Inside Drayton Hall Plantation
Inside Drayton Hall Plantation

The attached ‘flanker buildings did not survive the earthquake of 1886 (estimated to be a 7.3 register, perhaps the largest in US history) or the hurricane of 1893.

Rice and indigo were the main crops, the actual fields and holdings were here and all along the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Inside Drayton Hall Plantation
Inside Drayton Hall Plantation

The land and building are now owned by the National Trust for Historic Preservation and managed by the Drayton Hall Preservation Trust.

Inside Drayton Hall Plantation
Inside Drayton Hall Plantation

The property, house, and out buildings are maintained in a state of preservation, which is an ongoing project since it’s all close to 300 years old.

Drayton Hall, Ashley River, Charleston.

Kitchen, 1800’s Style

Technically I don’t think this is a ‘kitchen’. That term almost always describes a room inside a house. Outhouse, not so much either.

An out building I guess is a good enough description.

In the south meals were cooked in another building probably until the late 1800’s. The large homes in Charleston also had back buildings. I can’t imagine having fires all summer long. Too hot, besides everything burned down here at some point.

Kitchen, 1800's Style
Kitchen, 1800’s Style

These photographs are of a back building preserved at a plantation.

Kitchen, 1800's Style
Kitchen, 1800’s Style

I’ve never seen the doors open here so it may be storage now. The fact that it exists at all is nice.

Santee Delta, South Carolina.