Spoonbill Antics

Another small series of Roseate Spoonbill bouncing around chasing each other. And the poor spectators that get caught in the middle. Here an Anhinga.

Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics

The Spoonbill taking another’s branch actually gained a grand total of about 6 feet (2 meters) in the dead tree.

Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics
Spoonbill Antics

Odd birds that can be great entertainment on a quiet day.

 

Flight – Pink And White

My favorite type of wildlife photographs, without a doubt, are birds in flight. This site alone must have several thousand I’ve taken over the years. I’m not shy about holding the shutter as something flies past. In the past a friend joked about me being a ‘quick draw’. Of course I miss plenty, fill cards that have lots of deletes, but I get my share of fly by’s too.

Flight - Pink And White
Flight – Pink And White

Some are better than others. However I love to freeze that motion, up in the air. Both these birds make ignoring gravity look so darn easy.

Flight - Pink And White
Flight – Pink And White

Roseate Spoonbill, Great Egret, ACE Basin, South Carolina.

Delta Plantation, Monchrome

The Hampton plantation houses photographed from the marsh creek. The creek was the ‘entrance road’ off the Santee River and the beginning of the 25 large rice fields.

Delta Plantation, Monchrome
Delta Plantation, Monchrome

These are among the oldest original plantation buildings in the south. The main house was built in 1730. Being remote during the civil war the plantation was not burned. Also the construction of the buildings was primarily Black Cypress trees. The wood is resistant to insects and rarely burns. The US Navy still maintains wooded areas with this Cypress since it is the hardest wood known for ship building. The ‘unsinkable’ USS Constitution (old iron sides) is constructed of this type of cypress.

Hampton Plantation, Santee Delta, South Carolina.

In A Rice Field

I was waiting for the action. Osprey were circling, Eagles in the pines, and unsuspecting critters fishing directly in front of us.

Well, drama never happened. However I did have a nice peaceful marsh scene to fall back on.

Below we had Wood Storks fishing, a Great Blue Heron standing in the open, and in the back I notice an Anhinga in the reeds.

In A Rice Field
In A Rice Field
In A Rice Field
In A Rice Field
In A Rice Field
In A Rice Field

Not bad for a plan B.

Pelicans, Heron, Stork

A few days ago most of the marsh residents were working the far edges and avoiding the main dike road. This is when I use my monopod. I want to shoot long, wide, and at a slower speed.

A group of White Pelicans moved back and forth along a side dike. This path took them past other birds also working the reeds there.

The first photograph had two mixing with a Great Blue Heron. While the Heron is tall the difference is obvious. The Pelicans are much bigger.

Pelicans, Heron, Stork
Pelicans, Heron, Stork

Below Pelicans swam by a young Wood Stork. The stork was a juvenile, still when an adult is the tallest bird out here. Again the size difference is clear.

White Pelicans are huge birds. If they were able to stand straight they are just about the size of a person.

Some interesting comparisons.

Pelicans, Heron, Stork
Pelicans, Heron, Stork

ACE Basin.

TPJ Photography