Tag Archives: Church

Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins

This may be one of the most photographed places in the Lowcountry. While people associate the church and graveyard with Charleston is actually closer to Beaufort, South Carolina.

Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins

The traditional understanding is that Prince William’s was burned by the British in 1779 during the Revolutionary War, rebuilt in 1826, and then burned again in 1865 during the Civil War by the Federal Army under General William T Sherman’s orders.

Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins

The church was built as a ‘chapel of ease’ in the English Georgian style, using the Roman Tuscan or Doric order, between 1745 and 1753. Chapel of Ease being a church building to provide members with a place of worship in rural areas where the main church is too far.

Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins

Inside the ruins of the church lie the remains of Colonel William Bull, who “greatly assisted General Oglethorpe in establishing the physical layout of Savannah, Georgia. Bull surveyed the land in 1733 to form the basic grid pattern of the streets and squares.” The ruins may be the halfway mark between Charleston and Savannah.

Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William's Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins
Prince William’s Parish Church, Sheldon Ruins

Founded 1840, St. Matthew’s, Charleston

These are the final cut (at least I think so) of the shoot at St. Matthews in Charleston. I have finished the photographs in a few different formats and styles, but that’s part of the beauty with an old church like this.

Founded 1840, St. Matthew's, Charleston
Founded 1840, St. Matthew’s, Charleston

The light here comes from all sides, and even behind the alter (hidden windows) making it easier than some other churches for capturing details.

Founded 1840, St. Matthew's, Charleston
Founded 1840, St. Matthew’s, Charleston

Click any image for a full size view.

 

St. Matt, A Different Look

While finally getting around to finish the shoot at St. Matthews this photograph took on a softer look than most others.

St. Matt, A Different Look
St. Matt, A Different Look

I had started to tone things down for a final monochrome image. Ultimately I dropped all the toning but not the beautiful stained glass colors.

Now with luck I can finish the balance later. No swamp/marsh today, I need to act adult and do grownup things…ughhhh

Tents, Cabins

At a Methodist Campground, a location for community revival meetings, the cabins are referred to as tents.

Tents, Cabins
Tents, Cabins

The Israelites erected 99 tents around their Tabernacle in Leviticus (pretty sure that’s the chapter) which is the exact design here. These 99  tents/cabins surround the Tabernacle in the center of the open field.

Tents, Cabins
Tents, Cabins

Photographs taken outside St. George, South Carolina.

Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina

The town no longer exists, but an old church and cemetery remain.

Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina
Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina

Veterans from the US Civil War have the traditional metal military marker.

Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina
Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina

A small historical sign on a side road pointed us here. Like many southern towns it was named, and built, around the local court house. Appomattox Court House, location of the end of the US Civil War is another example.

Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina
Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina
Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina
Cemetery At Pickens Court House, South Carolina

There are newer headstones and CSA markers here since many grave sites were moved here when the area was flooded to create a hydroelectric plant.

 

Chapel Of Ease

This Anglican chapel was constructed in 1740 by planters on Saint Helena Island as a chapel of ease for parishioners who had difficulty traveling from plantations to worship at the main parish church in Beaufort, South Carolina.

Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease

“This ruin is significant as a relatively intact example of mid-eighteenth century tabby construction and for its association with the St. Helena Parish, both as a secondary and primary place of worship for inhabitants of the parish. It was built ca. 1740 as a chapel of ease, to serve planters in St. Helena Parish who lived at great distances from the parish church in Beaufort and could not regularly attend services there. By 1812, the population of St. Helena Island had increased to the extent that the chapel of ease was designated a parish church. The church was virtually abandoned when the planters evacuated the island in the fall of 1861. During the Federal occupation of St. Helena, the church was used frequently by several of the Northerners who had come to the island to educate and train the freedmen. It was also used as a sanctuary by Methodist freedmen as early as 1868, but was burned by a forest fire in February 1886 and was never repaired. Much of its historic fabric, including the church walls and much of its plaster, remains. A small cemetery adjacent to the church ruin contributes to the historic character of the property.” … National Historic Registry.

Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease

Stories are told that planters were gathered here as the news of Sherman’s approaching army was received. For a few years the Chapel was abandon.

Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease

The attached cemetery is still maintained also. The Fripp family crypt is here. The Fripp family were local plantation owners as well as sea captains charged with protecting the islands from roaming pirates which was still common since the area had a connection with the Caribbean islands.