All posts by Ted Jennings - TPJ Photography

Getting A Bath, Spoonbill

Loud, water flying everywhere.

Getting A Bath, Spoonbill - click to enlarge
Getting A Bath, Spoonbill – click to enlarge

At any one time there were several young Spoonbills splashing around. And of course I got shots of every single one, many times.

Getting A Bath, Spoonbill - click to enlarge
Getting A Bath, Spoonbill – click to enlarge

I finally just selected some at random here. There were way too many to even look at them all.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

Poking Around A Marshland

Many times when we enter marshlands the things happening are obvious.  Other times, especially mid day, we need to take some time and look around.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

This is also where selecting the right lens comes in. I really want to carry minimum ‘stuff’, the rest stays in the pack, in the car.

I could not photograph the swamp edge above with a long wildlife lens. I also would miss anything animals here with a short lens.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

From the 2 images above you can see where things are wide open  but can have thick trees. The scenes are beautiful, and different. This was only 50 yards (46m) apart.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

Pines begin at the end of the dikes. Bald Eagles can be sitting and watching hidden above. The lens here was not so long to catch a closeup of him.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

The need to shoot wide is obvious here. Not a single critter yet a nice view of the canals.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

Finally on the edge of a marsh something to catch at a mid range. American Alligator floating, as they tend to do 80% of the time.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

All the photographs here were taken with a Tamron 18-400mm lens.

A lens that covers a wider range than other lens which makes a great ‘all in one’.  That said, the focus is a slow and it needs a good amount of light. It’s an average quality lens that makes up for that short coming by being small, light, and a massive range.

Close Gallinule

This is a Common Gallinule, the is also a ‘purple’ species.

An odd bird that is around every swamp or marsh that has some thick cover. They feed in the open but run screaming for cover when they spot something.

Close Gallinule - click to enlarge
Close Gallinule – click to enlarge

Nice coloring but it’s their bill that is most interesting. Bright red, vivid yellow tip, and shines like cheap vinyl.

Close Gallinule - click to enlarge
Close Gallinule – click to enlarge
Close Gallinule - click to enlarge
Close Gallinule – click to enlarge

 

 

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial

Ladies and gentlemen, the answer we have all waited for… how do they do it.

Our thanks to several locals who generously volunteered their time to provide us with  ‘A Visual Tutorial Of Walking On Turtles’.

Boy’s and girl’s please do not try this at home.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

The first step is to find an old wooden ramp covered in cannon ball sized turtles.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

Once the location is discovered the slow, use your whole body technique is best. A simple step and hug method keeps the original turtle in place.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

Next gently lift you left foot up and onto the turtle head. Again a slow forward motion. A 3 minute rest between turtle hops is standard procedure.

Repeat steps 2 and 3 as needed until complete control of the prime resting spot is attained.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view gallery and a step by step best practices method.

At the end of the journey any comfortable position should be available.

Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial - click to enlarge
Walking On Turtles, A Tutorial – click to enlarge

No turtles were eaten during the creation of this tutorial.

Unhappy Green Heron

I heard noise and saw the juvenile Little Blue Heron on the overhang. Might be nice so I took a few shots.

Unhappy Green Heron - click to enlarge
Unhappy Green Heron – click to enlarge

What I had not noticed was what was causing the fuss. A Green Heron must have been in this spot first. And he was not happy with the Little Blue.

Unhappy Green Heron - click to enlarge
Unhappy Green Heron – click to enlarge

Things are not always as they seem.

It’s nice to get a surprise. Better when it is a usable photograph.

Foggy Avocet

Cool nights and warmer mornings play havoc with early photographs. Even with LCD screens and electronic viewfinders it’s difficult to know if you captured anything.

Foggy Avocet - click to enlarge
Foggy Avocet – click to enlarge

This is where knowing your gear can really help. A little luck doesn’t hurt either.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

 

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage

One of the early arrivals.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge

The warmer weather has thrown the birds off a little so more could arrive any time now.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge