Tag Archives: Bird Photography

Daydreaming Pelican

I was waiting for this Brown Pelican to take off, we were floating close to shore.

Daydreaming Pelican
Daydreaming Pelican

You can see he is just standing on the spit of land, the surf  lapping at his feet.

However, nothing.

Daydreaming Pelican
Daydreaming Pelican

So what was he doing…

Daydreaming Pelican
Daydreaming Pelican

Just letting his feet get wet.

A pretty bird, made a great photo, but some action ?

Not happening. Again proves you never know what you might find out there 😂.

A Marsh Scene

Actually two scenes.

A Marsh Scene
A Marsh Scene

Above has a little of everything. Egret, Great Blue, Anhinga, and of course a floating head (Alligator) under the outstretched branch.

A typical scene in one of the large marshlands.

A Marsh Scene
A Marsh Scene

The second, with an Anhinga, shows how dense the marsh grasses grow. Miles of these grass lands.

The bird is sitting on an old wooden structure that we can only guess what it’s original use was.

ACE Basin, South Carolina.

White Ibis

Today the heat was bearable !

Recently the heat index has been 112 – 117 degrees , actual 95 – 100. In Celsius an average of 37 to 46. Oh yeah humidity near 100% with no rain… somehow that’s a real thing.

Today it is 88, almost cool.

We ventured out and were quickly greeted by a White Ibis.

White Ibis
White Ibis

Better yet, he was without mud.

White Ibis
White Ibis

I consider this a win.

 

Glimpse On A Tricolored Heron

Considering this Tricolor just dropped out of the tree, and then did a U Turn these didn’t come out all that bad.

Glimpse On A Tricolored Heron
Glimpse On A Tricolored Heron
Glimpse On A Tricolored Heron
Glimpse On A Tricolored Heron

This is a common trick when in big roosting locations.

It’s easier to ‘pop out’ than navigate through the thick branches, and other birds. Frustrating since it’s rare to get any decent shots. Hardly any time to raise the lens no less focus.

Yellow-crowned Night Heron

We spotted this Heron from a boat, at a distance.

I don’t think of Night Herons as shore birds, but there are salt marshes, and wooded areas, along the estuaries.

These estuaries are known to be one of the clearest and most diverse in the US. I am never surprised at what we find here.

Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron

He sat in this Live Oak preening and doing the ‘fluff’ never once paying attention to us floating by.

I guess a boat is as good as a car for a ‘bird blind’.

Yellow-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron

Stono River, South Carolina.

Little Blue Became A Night Heron

I spotted a bird in flight in the corner of my eye.

A Little Blue Heron going past at full speed.

Little Blue Became A Night Heron
Little Blue Became A Night Heron

I was focused and ready for an Alligator in the marsh so I was pretty much set, a change to a closer subject but the Little Blue was in a good spot.

Little Blue Became A Night Heron
Little Blue Became A Night Heron

Of course later on after downloading the photos… it was a juvenile Night Heron. A bird faster than I planned on.

Little Blue Became A Night Heron
Little Blue Became A Night Heron

Another of those surprises you get when shooting wildlife.

Little Blue Became A Night Heron
Little Blue Became A Night Heron

But I did get the Alligator in the background who was the original target.

I must admit, if I planned on the Night Heron in the first place good chance I missed. He was moving along pretty fast.

 

Roseate Spoonbill, ACE Basin

One of a few found in a large marsh the other day. A true ‘rock star’ of the bird world… everyone loves this guy.

Roseate Spoonbill, ACE Basin
Roseate Spoonbill, ACE Basin

A little known factoid here; Around 10% of young Spoonbills are adventurers.

When they are old enough to fledge and feed themselves they join the adult population, small flocks, and follow them to known feeding areas.

But not all. A small number branch out on their own. This has saved them from extinction. An Audubon naturalist keep written notebooks for many years. The main Spoonbill population died out with the changes to Florida’s water flows. However, that 10% moved off, found new locations, and keep the species alive in North America.

Now, they live in South Carolina and Georgia. This year a few are in Virginia, and way out of place… Long Island, New York. Every year some are spotted around the US. Tropical birds blown off course, probably. Still they were far away to start with.