Tag Archives: Bird Photography

Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill

The Spoonbill walked through a rice field the other day doing the typical digging around for small prey.

Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill
Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill

They like to walk along while turning their beak back and forth through the shallow water. This stirs up anything that may be in front of them.

Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill
Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill

I’ve seen them go the entire length of a marsh sifting all around.

Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill
Walking By, Roseate Spoonbill

ACE Basin.

Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River

These were taken the first week in September and promptly went to the ‘black hole of photographs’. No reason I can think of since I, like most people, enjoy the big pink birds.

Spoonbill By Charleston's Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston's Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston's Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River

I think the tide was pulling the water back out to the river. This is not a place I would usually associate with Spoonbill, I always think big marshes.

Spoonbill By Charleston's Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston's Cooper River
Spoonbill By Charleston’s Cooper River

For photographers who don’t want to venture out to places in the ACE Basin they can wander close to home and maybe get a few shots.

Outside Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston.

Tricolored Passing

Not the fastest in flight but certainly not the slowest.

Tricolored Passing
Tricolored Passing
Tricolored Passing
Tricolored Passing

He popped up out of a marsh and came past me instead of going the logical path… the other direction.

Tricolored Passing
Tricolored Passing

I think I was at an odd angle here turning as he went by.

Tricolored Passing
Tricolored Passing

You don’t get to pick the how you would like it. Actually there are times we just skip an opportunity for one reason or another.

Of course that’s at the end of the day when the gear feels twice as heavy.

Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style

This is the perfect Spoonbill feeding spot. Small fish and insects must be right here. Fresh water and swampy, who could ask for more.

Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style
Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style
Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style
Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style

A Black-bellied Whistling Duck sat on the side just watching them work.

Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style
Searching For Treats, Spoonbill Style

Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom

Roseate Spoonbills use their unique bill to sift through shallow water and the marsh bottom for small insects and fish.

Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom
Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom

A Spoonbill needs a very specific water depth to feed. Above you can see it is just below their knee. This is perfect for feeding.

Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom
Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom
Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom
Spoonbill Sifting The Bottom

Spoonbills are considered a bellwether for how healthy a marshland environment is. Their movement has been studied in Florida since the 1950’s. Disappearing flocks helped identify and predict water flow problems through the Everglades and Keys.

The good news is some Spoonbills are not afraid to change their locations and will migrate to new areas keeping the species healthy.