Tag Archives: Black and White

The Perfect Landing, Great Egret

A dull and damp back drop was perfect for this beautiful white bird.

The Perfect Landing, Great Egret
The Perfect Landing, Great Egret – click to enlarge

I tried to follow the bird as he flew over the marsh but could not grab focus until the moment of landing.  The old dead tree was directly in front of me, a great angle.

I’ll take it, the photographs came out better than I could have hoped for.

The Perfect Landing, Great Egret
The Perfect Landing, Great Egret – click to enlarge

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

Sepia Cemetery

Tall grass and broken branches are common in this cemetery. Sometimes the images from here almost look liked a staged studio shot. Perfect for monochrome or black and white work.

Sepia Cemetery - click to enlarge
Sepia Cemetery – click to enlarge

I shot this one spot several times using different angles and distances. In past years I would work with a smaller lens, portrait style. Now I use a zoom that gives me a huge range from true wide angle all the way to almost ‘super zoom’. It makes it easier, and I have many more options.

Sepia Cemetery - click to enlarge
Sepia Cemetery – click to enlarge

Both photographs are from the same location. Above was just closer and from a lower angle.

 

Original Cross Of Honor 1862

I found this Southern Cross Of Honor in an old cemetery today and it looks to be an original. The metal plaque was hidden away next to an old marker.

Cross Of Honor 1862 - click to enlarge
Cross Of Honor 1862 – click to enlarge

It took a little research to figure this out.

The Confederate States approved a metal grave marker for their military burials in 1862. However, they didn’t make many since there was a shortage of metal due to the war.

In 1899 the Daughters of the Confederacy organization made and distributed them. The ‘Daughters’ was a charity organization originally created to help widows and children of military casualties.

One of the most beautiful old buildings in Charleston was built by them to house veteran families.

Note: The organization’s treatment of the Confederacy, along with its promotion of the Lost Cause movement, is viewed by historians as advocacy of white supremacy.

Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds

Shooting wildlife, and publishing in sepia or black and white can be much more difficult than color. Animals survive by blending into their surroundings.

Selecting the correct photographs with the right amount of shading and distinct subject is the only way I know how to make it work.

Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds - click to enlarge
Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds – click to enlarge

Above is a juvenile Tricolored Heron sitting frozen as I took my shots. As long as I kept moving slowly on the dike the bird was content to hide.

Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds - click to enlarge
Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds – click to enlarge

No hiding, or even being still above. A flock of Wood Storks, numbering in the hundreds would feed, rise up as a group, and move a short distance down the marsh to continue feeding.

Large flocks do this because as they feed they are also driving the fish away to safety. The birds need to catch up to, and drop down in the middle of the moving schools of fish.

Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds - click to enlarge
Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds – click to enlarge

The single Ibis above was just one of hundreds that would drift away from the masses. A photograph of a flock in flight is chaos, I prefer to wait until several separate and move away.

Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds - click to enlarge
Working In Sepia, Marsh Birds – click to enlarge

Last is this solitary Great Blue Heron. The larger Herons seem to avoid areas of the flocks. Solitary by nature I can find them off on the fringe away from the noise.

Everyone of these photographs have something in common, the primary subject is distinct and obvious. I don’t always consider this when working in color. In color I am interested in the story and even hidden subjects can work well.