Tag Archives: Colorful

Wildflowers With The Stones

In this old cemetery it’s not often people visit any grave sites. I think there are more photographers and raccoons on any given day.

Wildflowers With The Stones
Wildflowers With The Stones

There is still color here, the small blooms in spring cover much of the old graves.

Wildflowers With The Stones
Wildflowers With The Stones

I prefer this to a bunch of hot house flowers wrapped in string.

Found A River

While this may seem like an odd title, it’s not for me. I have ‘minimal’ sense of direction. I’m convinced it comes from being born in NYC, everything is in a grid. You don’t need any spatial skills, there were signs on every corner.

Found A River
Found A River

This is the Cooper river, north of Charleston and flows to the Atlantic Ocean past the city.

I say I found it since it was on the end of a trail I walked, in a new area. I knew it should be right there, but really, that doesn’t mean much with me.

Found A River
Found A River

Because we are flat (hence Lowcountry name) it winds around lazy like. If you know the George Gershwin musical Porgy And Bess, or the song ‘Summertime’ you know the area. it was written in Charleston.  Actually the Folly Beach part of town where this river hits the back end of Folly.

Found A River
Found A River

And as expected wildlife followed. When I hit the river I heard Osprey, they came over the tree line.

Found A River
Found A River

Of course I took the shot. Short lens, but a beautiful raptor right over my head.

 

That Head Clearly Belongs To A Water Moccasin

One to steer away from. This is the only viper that stays with water. Also called a Cottonmouth.

That Head Very Clearly Belongs To A Water Moccasin
That Head Very Clearly Belongs To A Water Moccasin

I learned something the other day in conversation with a friend who is a biologist and works in these swamps.

If you get bit, hope it’s by a big one. Turns out a full grown Cottonmouth knows how much venom to use. They are careful because it takes a lot for them to create more. A little guy gives you all he has, and it doesn’t take much…

That Head Very Clearly Belongs To A Water Moccasin
That Head Very Clearly Belongs To A Water Moccasin

I’ll try to avoid them all.

 

Quietly Waiting, Barred Owl

Barred Owls have been very busy this year. Besides returning to the small swamp ponds to hunt they nested and have young.

Quietly Waiting, Barred Owl
Quietly Waiting, Barred Owl

To date I have not taken any shots of an Owlet this year. Every time I see one it’s either too dark or far. However, Ellen has been searching for them more than me and does have a few youngster photographs.

Now that we are reaching the 95 (+) temperatures (35C +) I’m less inclined to brave the wet and bugs. However, I did commit to going this evening. Time to dig out the feather weight hiking pants.

1820, A Charleston Grand House

This house was built by Charleston merchant John Robinson who, with the fickleness of early nineteenth century fortunes, lost it soon afterwards. Several trading ships he owned were lost at sea. The house was sold to cover his debts though he was not legally responsible.

1820, A Charleston Grand House
1820, A Charleston Grand House

During the bombardment of Charleston, many of the grand houses were pounded into rubble, but this house escaped due to its placement further up Charleston’s slender peninsula. However, when Charleston fell to Union forces in 1865 the house was looted and William Aiken arrested and taken to Washington for trial. He was later released due to the intervention of northern politicians he’d made friends with during his political heyday.

1820, A Charleston Grand House
1820, A Charleston Grand House

Unlike many of the old houses here there was a large parcel of property. Behind the main house there are stables and quarters for a large number of enslaved people.

1820, A Charleston Grand House
1820, A Charleston Grand House

Prior to the US Civil War William Aiken was not only a wealthy planter/merchant he was also the states governor.

Though their house had been looted, abused, and most of its valuables stolen, the Aiken family managed not to lose their home to federal taxes like so many did. They hung on and stayed on, as did most of the old families in Charleston. Too poor to paint and too proud to whitewash, as the saying goes. In the Aiken’s case, this meant wallpaper peeled, and carpets grew threadbare. It meant fabrics and plaster began to disintegrate, and in some places dry rot set in. With little money for wood or coal to heat large spaces, grand rooms were shut up entirely. It meant multiple generations lived together, paying expenses as best they could.  Their descendants occupied it until 1975.

Note; much of the information above was provided by the South Carolina Picture Project.