Tag Archives: photography

Lip Lapping, Green Heron

Finally! For some reason it has taken almost 2 years to catch one again. Green Heron have no lips, that’s obvious. Which begs the question… why do they lick their lips.

I have caught them before but not recently. However, wait for it…

Lip Lapping, Green Heron
Lip Lapping, Green Heron

Not yet…

Lip Lapping, Green Heron
Lip Lapping, Green Heron

He’s getting ready…

Lip Lapping, Green Heron
Lip Lapping, Green Heron

And some lip lapping.

Enter Green Heron in the search box on this site and scroll through the articles. I never marked  any text with the lapping thing, but just look. You’ll see they actually do this as a habit.

 

Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron

The road leaving the manor house at Magnolia Plantation passes a large garden pond. Being part swamp Cypress grow here, large cane, reeds, and of course flowers bloom along the edges.

Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron
Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron

There is a river and large marshlands behind the manor that is filled with wildlife. This pond is a great place for them to visit.

Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron
Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron

Herons walk and fish here often. The people touring this plantation get an extra treat at times.

Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron
Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron

Half the time people are so busy with the large birds they miss another local swim by.

Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron
Adding Something Extra To A Pond, Heron

The other visitor hiding under the water doesn’t want to bring any attention to themselves anyway.

1820, Lighting The Stairs

For me a house and location like this is best done in any B&W or monochrome style.

This house was grand in it’s day. It still is, but time has taken it’s toll. Ownership remained the same after the US Civil War, however the wealth was gone. The building slowly decayed, and the Hurricanes hitting the Charleston peninsula did not help. Today the home is maintained to conserve the house as it is now. Damage and all.

This has a little more contrast than my usual the light needed it.

1820, Lighting The Stairs
1820, Lighting The Stairs

I don’t think converting the lamp to electricity hurt the beauty at all.

Leaving, Great Blue

This is a single photograph of a Heron ‘touch and go’ food drop. The juveniles were too aggressive so food delivery can be the only interaction the adult has now.

Leaving, Great Blue
Leaving, Great Blue

The reason for a single image here is focus and greenery. We have come to that time when the trees and branches have leafed out.

Even though I did have a clear shot grabbing focus is hard. For these in flight photos I use a 4 point focus setting.

If I can’t get the center exact the 4 surrounding focus points should work. Theory but usually right. Except when branches in the background are large or full.

Here focus was grabbing different pieces of the background. So, a single in flight photograph.

A Prothonotary Warbler

I don’t see these birds out in the open very often. They seem to prefer tree tops, thick branches, and anything else that will ruin a good photograph.

A Prothonotary Warbler
A Prothonotary Warbler

Based on the caterpillar I assume he found enough to lure him out in the open. And lucky he jumped out of the swamp greenery for a few minutes.

Worn And Weathered

Magnolia Cemetery was the first true cemetery in Charleston. Tradition was still strong to be buried in your church grave yard. Elsewhere cemeteries with opulent head stones and mausoleum where popular.

Worn And Weathered
Worn And Weathered

The well known and wealthy citizens of Charleston supported the cemetery, but not enough to be buried there.

The US Civil War was a great equalizer. At the end of the war Charleston, once the wealthiest city in the US, had lost all it’s riches.

Soldiers and sailors were buried here then, and soon after much of the city was joining them.

It’s A Big World Out There, Heron

A young Great Blue, not ready to fly off, but wondering what’s out there.

It’s A Big World Out There, Heron
It’s A Big World Out There, Heron

Some in this rookery have taken the first steps of flying. At first they head straight for a large tree, someplace to quickly land. After a few test runs, they circle and spin seeming to have fun with the whole idea.

It’s A Big World Out There, Heron
It’s A Big World Out There, Heron

This little one was still considering it all.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator

OK, this is an article with a large number of photographs. Don’t let that put you off, it’s a funny and interesting story. He really was a ‘pushy bugger’.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

The following images are in order of our ‘encounter’. And really it started like any other, nothing special.

Below is PB (pushy bugger) and he was floating close to the bank in the corner of this swamp. He was pushing around in the weeds catching whatever his nose bumped into. Typically young gator feeding and he looked to be a couple of years old.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

I took a few shots and stepped to the edge.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

So, PB turned and look, a surprise. His tail had been hidden and based on that curve my age guess was a little off, by at least 2 years. Still at around 4 feet (1.3 meters) I knew by standing above him on the bank I looked huge to him.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

Above he turned some more, looked at me, and moved his head around fishing. You can see the water he has pushed around.

Oh my…

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

He put on a little speed and slipped right in front of me, the shot above looking straight down. I did notice he really wasn’t swimming either. His legs were long enough to touch bottom. Perhaps another miscalculation?

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

About now PB was facing me, almost on the swamp bank, doing what Alligators will do. Stare up at you and float around. However, his foot was not supposed to be reaching out… toward me and the bank.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

The moment of truth. I’m not new at this. Apparently neither is he.

At this point my camera can only get the top of his head in focus, and I’m staring down through the view finder…not really looking. No good perspective.

He is staring (as you can see) up into the viewfinder. I want the shot, he wants my space. For the shot… he’s coming and I’m staying.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

We both shifted at about the same time. He brushed past, I turned to keep him in focus.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

As you can clearly see, he was completely intimidated by me.

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

So concerned he turned his back on me as he almost stepped on my toes. LOL

Pushy Bugger, Alligator
Pushy Bugger, Alligator

My new friend PB took perhaps 3 or 4 steps and found the sunny spot he wanted in the first place. He dropped right down to warm up. Alligators do love their sun.

We were both winners. He found a great sun spot, no one to bother him. I got a a nice series, and kept my toes.

All in all a good afternoon.