Tag Archives: South Carolina

Working Late (1)

Sun was setting but this Great Blue was working hard at gathering nesting materials.

Working Late (1)
Working Late (1)

The fact that I was there was not an issue. The big soft Spanish Moss was more important.

Working Late (1)
Working Late (1)
Working Late (1)
Working Late (1)

He had made several trips for this treasure and light was fading fast.

Working Late (1)
Working Late (1)

 

Phoebe On A Knee

Cypress trees have roots that grow straight up above the ground, called a ‘knee’.  Trap might be a better name since you cannot avoid tripping on them.

Phoebe On A Knee
Phoebe On A Knee

Eastern Phoebes use them as perches to look over the waters surface for small insects. Swamps have Cypress Knees, insects, so of course Phoebes love to be here.

Phoebe On A Knee
Phoebe On A Knee

When you spot a Phoebe it’s best to focus the camera on the Knee. The bird will almost always return to the perch after each dive for an insect.

 

Ibis Settling In

A new routine for the end of day, Ibis flocking.

Ibis Settling In
Ibis Settling In

Just before dark they have started to arrive, in a Cypress tree that has always been a Heron roost. Maybe not this year though.

Ibis Settling In
Ibis Settling In

It might be hard for a Heron to get comfortable after 10-15 of these guys swoop in all around you. They like to mumble to each other, a lot.

You Can Hear For Miles, Great Blue Calls

A unique sound, not what you would expect, but one you will not forget.

Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles

The call is deep and raspy, almost a long drawn out cough.

Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles

The Great Blue leans back and stands up tall.

Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles

Most calls are reserved for their mates. Early in the year calling out for them to return to a nest, and later when a mate needs the other to return.

Can Hear For Miles
Can Hear For Miles Can Hear For Miles

When out photographing you will hear them from a long ways. For me the call tells me to walk a little faster, the Herons are on the move.

Charleston, South Carolina.

Night Heron Roost

I usually find Night Herons one or two at a time. Now it’s what I have come to expect.

Night Heron Roost
Night Heron Roost

I should be more careful because I’m not expecting quick flights when photographing one. These two Black-crowned were out in the open, easy to take my time.

Night Heron Roost
Night Heron Roost

Not really the time I expected, I missed one flying almost on my head. The tree with two in the open was filled with small Herons.

Night Heron Roost
Night Heron Roost
Night Heron Roost
Night Heron Roost

Good fortune though, I spotted more and watched where the others flew to. They landed right down the pond.

I guess this is their comfortable roost so I will try to come at it from different directions now. If I don’t scare them into flight it’s a win for both of us.

Charleston, South Carolina.

Cemetery Mallards

Almost city birds. A large pond, near the marsh and Cooper River, so it’s almost in town.

Cemetery Mallards
Cemetery Mallards

They did break the rule a little since Alligators do come over from the marsh. That’s why the ‘almost’ city dwellers.

Cemetery Mallards
Cemetery Mallards

Still it’s safer here than many other spots.

Cemetery Mallards
Cemetery Mallards

I’ve always loved Mallards. I once looked on line and found they are the second most photographed animal.

Yeah, number one… Cats of course.