Tag Archives: landscape

Charleston, Joseph Manigault

Built in 1803 Joseph Manigault’s home had a theme common to all the Charleston manor houses. It simply said ‘I have money’. Charleston was the wealthiest city in the country, the planters and traders  couldn’t spend fast enough.

The big houses made sure the entrance was bigger and better than their neighbors. Spiral designed stairs, free standing, were the center piece. Here we also had a crystal chandelier to add some sparkle.

Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault

This old home is one of my favorites so we visit here yearly. Each time there is something else that catches my eye. The houses were designed with huge windows for light. Each season during the year things are captured a little different.

Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault
Charleston, Joseph Manigault

The month of January there are less visitors and special passes are available to many of the historical buildings. We have photographed a few lately and may get one more day in this month.

Joseph Manigault house, Meeting Street, South Carolina.

Silhouette, Reddish Egret

Many wildlife photographers know the drama and dancing of both the Tricolored Heron and Snowy Egret.

This is the real master of dance the others imitate. The Reddish Egret.

Silhouette, Reddish Egret
Silhouette, Reddish Egret

Their entire life is spent on the beaches along the southern coasts of Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. Never inland, on a rare occasion the beaches / barrier islands of South Carolina and Georgia.

 

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The church is one of the oldest in Charleston. Like several others in town the congregation was formed when the original church could no longer support the growth. The First (Scotts) church is close to the harbor, this building is on what was considered the far end of Charleston.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

I had never been in the grave yard before. maybe the gates are usually locked. Compared to the local churches the burial area is small.

Many of the headstones were dated just a few years before the start of the US civil war. During the war minimal damaged occurred this far up the peninsular. Ships canon could not reach up here. However, during the federal troop occupation later on nothing was completely spared.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The black and white photographs were done a little different than my usual method. Here I used DxO Filmpack with a 35mm Delta film filter as the base conversion and modified to be a bit softer. I had forgotten how ‘rough’ Delta film actually was.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

Second Presbyterian Church, Meeting Street, Charleston.

Coots !!!

These strange sociable little critters may take over the marshes some day. It seemed like every body of open water had a covering of Coots. I’d never thought that many would be in the same place.

Coots !!!
Coots !!!
Coots !!!
Coots !!

Personally I really enjoy them. When they form a ‘raft’ and play follow the leader it’s like a few hundred (thousand) in a Conga Line.

While they are very similar to the Gallinule, running away screaming loudly is not their way. They just talk. To each other, to other birds they pass, or just to themselves. When you get a marsh full it’s a constant noise.

Coots !!!
Coots !!!

In some parts of the south Coots are known as Mud Hens.