Tag Archives: Monochrome

Guard Of Angels

An earthen mausoleum, ancient names called them barrows or burial mounds. Though this is certainly more ornate. Built by an old Charleston family going back to the original settlers from Barbados.

Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels

I’ve always thought this spot was perfect to be photographed using the old sepia colors and look.

Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels
Guard Of Angels

Charleston, South Carolina.

Joseph Manigault House, 1803, Charleston SC

When I work in B&W my first inclination is the old houses in Charleston. This house was completed only 20 years after the US Revolution. It shouts out ‘Money’.

The plantation economy created so much wealth some people in Charleston couldn’t spend enough. The manor houses competed with each other for attention.

Manigault House 1803
Manigault House 1803

Two things all the big homes had in common were intricate chandeliers and grand sweeping stair cases.

Manigault House 1803
Manigault House 1803
Manigault House 1803
Manigault House 1803

What more could a photographer want !

Great Blue Heron, Monochrome

Working through the photos from a swamp walk the other day I came across this.

It’s always the background that determines if an image works with no color. Shading and contrast makes or breaks it.

Great Blue Heron, Monochrome
Great Blue Heron, Monochrome

This Heron dropped down, after chasing another Great Blue, on the railing of an old wooden bridge ‘to nowhere’.  Dark trees gave the contrast needed.

 

 

Ambush

The warning clearly states ‘keep closed in wet locations’. Probably 100% humidity fits the description. Outside outlets must be covered.

However, the Anole can’t read.

Ambush
Ambush

Best to look before you touch something out here.

The little ones are hiding on the porch plant  pots, the big guys outside in places you least expect them.

Ambush
Ambush

Ready to pounce on just about anything, or anyone.

Pon Pon Crumbles

Pon Pon means ‘a bend in the river’, a Yemassee Native American name for this area near the Edisto river.

In 1706 the Church of England authorized 10 parish, with small outlier Chapels Of Ease for distant plantations and the population. This is the remains of the Pon Pon (St. Bartholomew’s Parish) chapel. It has always been in the middle of nowhere.

The first chapel, and the settlements in the ACE Basin were burned during the 1715 Yamasee War.

Pon Pon Chapel is in Jacksonboro, South Carolina. It was located “on Parker’s Ferry Road, the busy stagecoach thoroughfare that connected Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia.” Today, Parker’s Ferry Road is a dirt road along the south side of a power line right of way, and the ruins of the chapel can be found along this road east of Jacksonboro Road (State Road S-15-40). It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. (Wikipedia) Good luck finding it.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

What is left now is even very different than my first visit just 6 years ago. In theory a renovation is in the future. Reality says we should photograph what is here, while it’s still here.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, preached in the wooden building twice on April 24, 1737. That chapel was been plundered and burned.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

The cemetery here had been active until sometime in the 1930’s I believe. Most graves still visible here are from the mid 1800’s.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles

Hurricane Matthew did considerable damage on October 2017.

Pon Pon Crumbles
Pon Pon Crumbles
Note; These photographs were taken July 2022, I want to be sure the current date is included here since  these images are also being published by SCPictureProject an ongoing collection of historical records to preserve the history of South Carolina’s historic, natural, and cultural landmarks before they are lost to time.

The Group Of Six

Les Six” (pronounced [le sis]) is a name given to a group of six composers, five of them French and one Swiss, who lived and worked in Montparnasse. The name, inspired by Mily Balakirev’s The Five, originates in two 1920 articles by critic Henri Collet in Comœdia. Their music is often seen as a neoclassic reaction against both the musical style of Richard Wagner and the impressionist music of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel. (Wikipedia)

The Group Of Six
The Group Of Six

My interpretation of course, and a little better than velvet dogs playing poker.