Tag Archives: Cemetery

A Corner Of Southern Veterans

This is Charleston, South Carolina. It’s not unusual to find grave sites, or whole cemeteries, of confederate veterans. Hey, the war started less than 10 miles straight down the road from here.

This spot was just a little different in the individuals buried together. It caught my eye since this was my first day out in a while and I was wandering (a bit aimlessly) slowly around the old stones.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

In the 1800’s it was traditional to mark off burial plots with large, long, rectangular stone borders. The plots were for family, military regiments, or perhaps social groups like Masons.

But not here.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

This small section (above) is all CSA, confederate soldiers with no other obvious connection. Also most were not killed during the war which is how the typical CSA cemeteries are laid out.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

The obvious different age and quality of the head stones was striking.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

The largest stone was a monument to someone killed and buried elsewhere early in the war. Probably during the first incursion north by southern troops. Seabrook is an old family name in South Carolina. Why is the monument almost hidden here and not in one of the big family church grave sites.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

A few markers were for veterans that died many years after the war, the early 1900’s. All were CSA soldiers, but from different units.

The last little mystery is why at this spot, this group of men. Within this cemetery, the old Umbria Plantation land, is the CSA ‘Soldiers Ground’. It actually started during the Civil War because of the large number of troops needing to be buried.  Many soldiers and sailors are buried there. This group could have been among them.

Just some thoughts and questions that occurred to me standing there, camera in hand, shooting outside in the nice weather.

All photographs taken at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.

 

Found On A Walk

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston.

Found On A Walk
Found On A Walk

It’s not uncommon to find small gifts or tokens on some old monuments here.  Charleston is an old small city with many of the families living here going back hundreds of years.

What caught my eye was a fresh apple sitting on the stone.

Wood Storks, A Cemetery

Old Magnolia Cemetery sits along the Cooper River in the middle of large marshes.

Besides being one the most important historical cemetery sites it is also home to a diverse wildlife population.

Wood Storks
Wood Storks

Above, Wood Storks like to roost in the old Live Oaks looking over the marsh ponds.

Wood Storks
Wood Storks

In a recent visit I noticed what appeared to be Storks building a nesting frame. This would be significant since not long ago they were an endangered species.

Charleston, South Carolina.

Little Panda, Charleston

Baby Roselyn has had a new gift for a few months now. The drizzle didn’t seem to be doing too much damage to him.

Little Panda, Charleston
Little Panda, Charleston

For 150+ years small gifts have been left to keep her company.

A plaster casting, or death mask, of her is under the tram covering. Death Masks were common in the mid 1800’s but few remain in cemeteries now. Perhaps the covering has kept it well protected from weather all these years.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery

Andrew and Sarah (Calhoun) Simonds, 1889.

Andrew Simonds was a newspaper publisher, banker, business man, and incredibly wealthy in spite of the Civil War.

Sarah Calhoun was from the family of John C. Calhoun. Vice President, politician, plantation owner, all around scoundrel.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Cemetery

The sarcophagus was extraordinarily expensive to build at the time. It is one of the few that actually contain bodies and not just a memorial.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Cemetery

 

 

Strawberry 1725

At the right time I find this beautiful site to be haunting. Actually there is a story that has been repeated for 200+ years of a young girl tied to a tree over night by a ‘fire and brimstone’ preacher as punishment. The preacher was run out of the area, little girl survived but still roams the churchyard at night. I didn’t see her.

Strawberry 1725
Strawberry 1725

This chapel has survived the revolution and civil war.

The original family still owns and maintains the property. People from nearby plantations attended services here since the Anglican Church was too far.

Strawberry 1725
Strawberry 1725

A book, ‘Slaves In The Family’, written a few years ago has been a best seller and documents the history here in a narrative. The ruins of the Ball family plantation is just down the river here in the woods. Photos of ‘Commingtee’ plantation are also published on this web site.

Strawberry 1725
Strawberry 1725

There are other chapels like this around the coast, but most are ruins. I can’t help but visit here periodically for a few photos.

Strawberry Chapel, Childsbury, South Carolina.