Category Archives: Landscape

Landscape Photography

Earth Day 2019

For Earth Day 2019 I thought to publish a photograph that shows us what we have, and what we could easily lose. I think this is a day where we can be allowed a short ‘soap box speech’.

The photograph was taken where a delicate balance is working, but can be so easily tipped over.

Clear and flowing water, both fresh and tidal, are needed for this ecosystem to exist. Charleston, South Carolina, is one of the fastest growing places in the US…and it’s a straight shot from here. This would not be the first land to be lost to uncontrolled development.

Earth Day 2019
Earth Day 2019

Roseate Spoonbills, like the ones above, are actually benefiting from climate changes. They have lost habitat all through Florida, but these marshes here are warm enough now for tropical birds. A bright spot if the marshes are protected.

As for these Alligators, well no housing areas are going to allow dinosaurs to wander around. The water, and housing would doom them.

Last is the hundred small shore birds dotting the background here. All subtropical, and none would do well feeding in parking lots.

Now the good news, this photograph is from a huge protected area, for the foreseeable future they are safe. But it could never exist without knowing it’s needs and help.

Funding and government support is going in the total wrong direction now. Off shore oil drilling was approved here. No one wants it, but no one asked either.

OK, end of Earth Day rant.

Thanks,

Ted

 

At Old Pon Pon Chapel

In 1725 a chapel was allowed, in Pon Pon, by the Angelican church. No site for a church in this rural plantation area was agreed on so ‘chapels of easement’ were authorized.

At Old Pon Pon Chapel
At Old Pon Pon Chapel

Pon Pon burned several times and was finally abandoned around 1830.

The ruins and a small grave yard can be found down a dirt road in Colleton county, South Carolina.

Pon Pon
Pon Pon

A GPS does work out there, and you need it.

What I Saw April 18

Where fresh water meets tidal, water from the ocean.

The Atlantic is about 15 miles (24 k) from here and runs through large marshes. The other side here is behind an old dike, originally for rice plantations.

What I Saw April 18
What I Saw April 18

Water moves in, and out, through a series of wooden trunks dotted along the coastal areas. And Alligators like fresh water, so here they sit.

What I Saw April 18
What I Saw April 18

Oh, fish are pushed through also depending on the tide shift. A convenient place to eat too.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

In the Lowcountry the 1700’s to the 1800’s were the time of rich plantation owners, huge plantations, slavery, and war.

Often forgotten were the rural farmers working to survive. The Camp Grounds around Methodist Churches was all about bring them together in a single location.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

As it was explained to us, there is a lot of history here, but little written or saved. It has been handed down through the years.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

Traveling preachers came through for the meetings, people first gathered in tents, then cabins were built when the meetings took on a more permanent nature.

These are some of those cabins. This meeting ground serves 4 local communities, and has since the 1780’s. Many of these ‘tents’ are the original, repairs are made but the rule is simple and tents are based on the first ones built.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

Over time electricity was brought in, water and ‘necessities’ are still out back.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

The tents here are in a rectangle all facing the open sided Tabernacle. Other remaining camps in the south are similar. I was once told there is a description of settlements in the old testament of the Bible which some have followed.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

The cabins are owned by families in the area, many passed down through generations.

Meetings are held once a year in the fall. They are approximately a week long.

Cypress Methodist Camp (2)
Cypress Methodist Camp (2)

We appreciate the hospitality of Cypress Methodist for allowing us to visit and photograph the grounds and Church.