Category Archives: Landscape

Landscape Photography

Poking Around A Marshland

Many times when we enter marshlands the things happening are obvious.  Other times, especially mid day, we need to take some time and look around.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

This is also where selecting the right lens comes in. I really want to carry minimum ‘stuff’, the rest stays in the pack, in the car.

I could not photograph the swamp edge above with a long wildlife lens. I also would miss anything animals here with a short lens.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

From the 2 images above you can see where things are wide open  but can have thick trees. The scenes are beautiful, and different. This was only 50 yards (46m) apart.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

Pines begin at the end of the dikes. Bald Eagles can be sitting and watching hidden above. The lens here was not so long to catch a closeup of him.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

The need to shoot wide is obvious here. Not a single critter yet a nice view of the canals.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

Finally on the edge of a marsh something to catch at a mid range. American Alligator floating, as they tend to do 80% of the time.

Poking Around - click to enlarge
Poking Around – click to enlarge

All the photographs here were taken with a Tamron 18-400mm lens.

A lens that covers a wider range than other lens which makes a great ‘all in one’.  That said, the focus is a slow and it needs a good amount of light. It’s an average quality lens that makes up for that short coming by being small, light, and a massive range.

Foggy Avocet

Cool nights and warmer mornings play havoc with early photographs. Even with LCD screens and electronic viewfinders it’s difficult to know if you captured anything.

Foggy Avocet - click to enlarge
Foggy Avocet – click to enlarge

This is where knowing your gear can really help. A little luck doesn’t hurt either.

Click, or double tap, any image below to view the gallery.

 

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage

One of the early arrivals.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge

The warmer weather has thrown the birds off a little so more could arrive any time now.

Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage - click to enlarge
Great Egret, Start Of Breeding Plumage – click to enlarge

 

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff

One of the things I like about architectural photography is the different gear I get to ‘play’ with. And unlike wildlife photography it doesn’t weight a ton.

I keep a small drawstring bag in my kit with 2 lightweight lens. A 24mm and 50mm prime lens that can do most anything I need for this work.

Getting enough light inside these old houses is an issue. External flash units are prohibited. Prime lens open wider (faster) so light can be OK.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

Above is the top floor, in sepia, of a three story 1800’s spiral staircase. All the light was from a large set of windows on the right and the hall window straight ahead. The right window helped since I was shooting straight into the hall sun.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

 

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

Both back stairways were lit from a window. Shot with a Canon 24mm prime. On my Canon 7D2 that makes an equivalent lens of about a 36/37mm. A prime 35mm is a standard for street photography. So this works well here.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

The final lens I like to have is the old stand by Canon 18-135 kit lens, used above. If I did more of this work a Canon L series would replace it. This lens has always done well for me and is versatile so I don’t see a replacement any time soon.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

I believe the above was with the ‘nifty-fifty’, 50mm prime.

Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff - click to enlarge
Old Charleston Monochrome, Using My Stuff – click to enlarge

And last, another room shot with the 24mm prime. Unlike the other rooms I had plenty of light to work with.

The various lens used here are specialty type for specific work but none are particularly expensive. Using small primes makes you think different about composition but they are always sharper than a typical zoom.

It’s digital, so I can take extra photographs, change my settings all around, and finally fix things in post process if I screw up. I even bring an old Canon 70D at times, it weighs less. That camera wants more light, but I can fix most things. It’s digital.

 

 

A Black And White Sitting Room

I am photographing the history, at least old buildings, of Charleston more lately.

A Black And White Sitting Room - click to enlarge
A Black And White Sitting Room – click to enlarge

Working like this is on the opposite end of the spectrum from wildlife.

Besides, it’s cleaner.