Category Archives: Cemetery

Receiving Tomb

There are not many buildings like this around any longer. And yet here we have two, almost in sight of each other. I have seen a few others, but they were in colder climates.

Receiving Tomb
Receiving Tomb

This was a temporary place to hold the remains of the recently deceased. Buildings like this were important in areas where the ground was frozen.

Receiving Tomb
Receiving Tomb

Another ‘found on a walk’ series.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery

Taken in Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Cemetery

The clear lines and design of a cemetery is missing here. Area are still marked for boundaries, but they are stone edges, walls, or old wrought iron.

Found On A Walk, Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Cemetery

I find this to be much more peaceful than line upon line of uniform graves.

 

Described As The Little German Boy

A little research and I found this statue has a name ‘Little German Boy’. Considering the time frame of the headstones, places of birth, it fits.

Described As The Little German Boy
Described As The Little German Boy
Described As The Little German Boy
Described As The Little German Boy

The Bethany Cemetery was created when the old Lutheran one in Charleston suddenly was full due to a yellow fever epidemic.

Later on the actual site of the first cemetery was lost. In the 1930’s the church land was sold off in lots, fast forward to 1981 and graves were found during excavation. Later on 437 graves were relocated to Bethany.

 

Bethany Cemetery

Photographers drive right past this beautiful site. The old Magnolia Cemetery is at the end of this small road. The Charleston Cemeteries Historic District encompasses a cluster of 23 cemeteries north of downtown Charleston, South Carolina.

Bethany Cemetery
Bethany Cemetery

Owned and maintained by St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, the land was purchased by the church in 1856 when its first cemetery on Reid Street – called Hampstedt Cemetery – reached capacity during a yellow fever outbreak.

Early grave sites are primarily of German Lutherans, members of the original St. Matthews congregation.

Bethany Cemetery
Bethany Cemetery

The chapel here has one of the last ‘Receiving Tombs’ along with Magnolia that still exist. The deceased were placed here until the burial site was ready. They were common up north where the ground might be frozen.

Bethany Cemetery
Bethany Cemetery

The grounds here have a different feel from the older Magnolia Cemetery. Sites are newer and the grounds are more laid out like a traditional cemetery.

When Magnolia was first opened a cemetery was a new idea. Burials had always been in a church grave yard. The first ‘destination’ type cemetery was the St. Louis # 1 in New Orleans LA., next was St. Bonaventure down the road in Savannah GA, Magnolia here was a few years later. These three cemeteries are the most famous, and filmed, in the US.

Bethany Cemetery
Bethany Cemetery

Bethany  is known for its fine Victorian-era funerary headstones and monuments.

Bethany Cemetery
Bethany Cemetery

Louis Behrens C.F.D.

I’m sure at the time this was an incredible monument. Mr. Behrens was a fireman, and ultimately fire chief of Charleston. He is buried in the Bethany Cemetery outside Charleston.

Louis Behrens C.F.D.
Louis Behrens C.F.D.

This (I assume) bronze bust is attached to his headstone. And…it is larger than life. From what I have found he was very advanced for the time and well known.

All very nice but I have to say this when seen across the cemetery is a shade creepy.

Louis Behrens C.F.D.
Louis Behrens C.F.D.

The grave site is large but it would need to be considering the size of his head.

Louis Behrens C.F.D.
Louis Behrens C.F.D.

When I first noticed the monument I thought Mr. Behrens was a WW1 Prussian General. Maybe he was before being Fire Chief.