Category Archives: Cemetery

Busy Old Trees

Most places in the Lowcountry have some type of pond or swamp. This includes cemeteries. Magnolia Cemetery has a lake in the center. I’m guessing it is an old rice field since this was originally the Umbra Plantation.

Busy Old Trees
Busy Old Trees

Very old trees, many Live Oaks with moss, line the bank.  Black-crowned Night Herons nest and live in here year round.

Busy Old Trees
Busy Old Trees

It’s like a summer vacation rental for the Wood Storks. They nest and raise young in hidden spots, then spend the summer and fall away from the kids here.

Busy Old Trees
Busy Old Trees

Last resident I found in the thicket was a single White Ibis.

It appears more species have moved in here this year. Of course last year we were locked down so it’s a guess on my part.

No long lens this day. I pushed my walk around gear for these. It is nice to see an assortment like this so I went for the shots.

Charleston, South Carolina.

 

View Of First Scots Presbyterian Church

The staircase in Nathaniel Russell’s house (1808) has a clear view of the old First Scots Presbyterian Church (1814) and the graveyard.

View Of Scots Presbyterian Church
View Of Scots Presbyterian Church

Two of my favorite photography subjects, in the same shot.

Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery

Walking through the old sections of southern marsh cemetery.

Every walk should be a slow meandering trip here. You will miss things like this.

Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery

Rust, and some ruin, have hit the old wrought iron fences. However it just adds a bit more interest and beauty.

Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery
Found On A Walk, Old Charleston Cemetery

 

 

Mausoleums Along A Marsh

Taken on a walk, old Charleston Cemetery.

Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh

Shooting scenes like this is where I much prefer black and white. The images are busy for this type of photograph but using both dodge and burn they work out well.

Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh

When I first started to shoot around Charleston only prime lens were used. That turned out to be very limiting and some shots I wanted could not even be done due to space constraints.

Now I give myself a huge range by carrying an 18-400mm. Most photos are still taken wide but now I don’t have any space problems.

Mausoleums By A Marsh
Mausoleums By A Marsh

Old Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.

Ann Bull Heyward – 1851

Found in the Bull family cemetery, Anglican chapel, St. Helena barrier island.

Ann Bull Heyward - 1851
Ann Bull Heyward – 1851

Both the Bull and Heyward families are found throughout Charleston and South Carolina history. In Charleston several of the larger manor houses were owned by family members. They were plantation owners here until the union army came up through Georgia.

Many barrier islands were abandoned ahead of the army’s arrival.

You never know what you may find out here.

The Man, Not Flag, Is The Story

Brig-General Ripley did just about anything a man of his time could do. He was a General in the southern CSA army, but that is just a piece. I have seen his grave site numerous times but never really researched him.

So…

The Man, Not Flag Is The Story
The Man, Not Flag Is The Story
  • Born in Worthington, Ohio, moved to New York when young
  • Attended West Point with  Ulysses S. Grant, William B. Franklin, Samuel G. French and Franklin Gardner.  Two served as prominent Generals in the Union Army, the other two Generals in the CSA.
  • Served in the Mexican American War in most every important battle. He later wrote 2 volumes of well known history of the war.
  • He was engaged in the Second Seminole War in Florida in 1849, where again he saw combat.
  • Served the US Army in Charleston SC, marrying into the families of Charleston, and the USA, founders.
  • From 1853–1854 he was the publisher of the Baltimore Daily American Times.
  • He directed the bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor on April 13, 1861 starting the US Civil War.
  • After the war, Ripley went abroad and resided in England for over twenty years.
  • In the late 1880’s he moved back to NYC where he died.
  • In 1887 he was buried in the (old) Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina.

These are just the highlights of his life.

He lived, worked, and fought wars all around the world… in the 1800’s.

 

Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.