Category Archives: Cemetery

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The church is one of the oldest in Charleston. Like several others in town the congregation was formed when the original church could no longer support the growth. The First (Scotts) church is close to the harbor, this building is on what was considered the far end of Charleston.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

I had never been in the grave yard before. maybe the gates are usually locked. Compared to the local churches the burial area is small.

Many of the headstones were dated just a few years before the start of the US civil war. During the war minimal damaged occurred this far up the peninsular. Ships canon could not reach up here. However, during the federal troop occupation later on nothing was completely spared.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

The black and white photographs were done a little different than my usual method. Here I used DxO Filmpack with a 35mm Delta film filter as the base conversion and modified to be a bit softer. I had forgotten how ‘rough’ Delta film actually was.

Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian
Grave Yard, Second Presbyterian

Second Presbyterian Church, Meeting Street, Charleston.

Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant

There’s nothing subtle about them. The males you can ID from far away. It’s like they have big puffy heads.

I find them to be as shy as a Wood Duck. The only place I ever get consistent opportunities is the ponds around old Magnolia Cemetery. Even there most shots are long.

I waited along a hidden place on the bank of the pond to get these closer than normal, shots.

Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant
Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant

Below is a female. No crazy colors, but still a puffy head.

Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant
Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant

Mergansers are diving ducks and prefer fish caught under the surface. So, a shy bird, who swims under water. A good reason they are hard to photograph.

Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant
Hooded Merganser, A Little Flamboyant

Mergansers spend the winter in the Lowcountry. We do have year round residents but I don’t see many and we are out and about often.

Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis

I’m not the only one that likes to roam around the old cemeteries.

Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis
Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis

The cemetery backs up to the large Charleston Harbor marshes so having Ibis is nothing new. But this day there were multiple bands of them around, poking and mumbling as only Ibis do.

Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis
Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis
Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis
Cemetery Visitors, White Ibis

Charleston, South Carolina.

Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.

Some of the military headstones inscriptions are becoming lost to the weather. Both of these soldiers were in volunteer regiments.

Volunteer regiments were provided by individual states to the general armed services. This was done on both the northern and southern sides.

North Carolina Volunteer

Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.
Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.
Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.
Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.

South Carolina Volunteer

Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.
Volunteer Regiments, N.C. / S. C.

Photographed in ‘Soldiers Ground’ cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.

Cemetery Rust

There’s something I find fascinating about the old rusting wrought iron found in the 1800’s cemeteries.

There is no way to repair these gates, fences, and posts. Age has taken them.

Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust

In many places you can’t walk past them at all.

Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust

In this one spot there are hundreds of iron markers and posts. Some held up by chains, others leaning on each other.

Cemetery Rust
Cemetery Rust

To me each one is a piece of art, the random ruin just adds to the beauty.

At the very least each time I walk through I am creating a record of all the iron work art that was once here.

Charleston, South Carolina.