Category Archives: Egret

Spoonbill (And Friend)

The Roseate Spoonbill made a permanent claim to this branch. A few others came and went yet the Spoonbill spent the morning in that same spot.

Spoonbill (And Friend)
Spoonbill (And Friend)

The first shot I had hoped the Snowy Egret would shift a little. Never happened.

Spoonbill (And Friend)
Spoonbill (And Friend)

I came back a few times and of course pushed the button again.

Spoonbill (And Friend)
Spoonbill (And Friend)

A single pink bird the entire morning.

Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022

Several scenes here taken in a few ACE Basin marshes the other day. Each photograph is a little different environment , yet all were shot within marshlands the same day.

Snowy Egret in an open cut and old rice field.

Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022
Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022

A large adult Alligator drifting through a pond with a deep cover of duck weed.

Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022
Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022

Tricolored Heron flying between stands of reeds and cane. The waters were covered by duck weed with open spots.

Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022
Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022

Great Egret moving along the edge of a tall dike. Older dikes are covered with growth on the sides hiding the fact they are really tall walls of dirt and mud. On each side is a large marsh fed with water from a series of trunks.

Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022
Marsh Scenes, Sept. 2022

ACE Basin, South Carolina.

Egret Marsh Scenes, September 2022

A few scenes of Great Egrets in an old Charleston rice field.

Egret Marsh Scenes
Egret Marsh Scenes
Egret Marsh Scenes
Egret Marsh Scenes

This marsh area is behind a dike along the Ashley River just up stream from Charleston.

Egret Marsh Scenes
Egret Marsh Scenes

The reeds and cane must be at least 6 feet tall now. Another few weeks and they will begin to bow down and turn golden.

Great Egret Fly By

A Great Egret here moving between two dikes. I was down low and could have lost any chances due to the higher grasses. Lucky the bird stayed just high enough to catch a small series.

Great Egret Fly By
Great Egret Fly By

He went straight to the corner where dikes connect, and a stand of trees blocking any further images.

Great Egret Fly By
Great Egret Fly By

The definition on the wings came out fairly good. One of those times I must have stayed with a Spot Metering on.

Great Egret Fly By
Great Egret Fly By

Donnelley WMA, South Carolina.

 

Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh

The largest dike in this marsh separates tidal salt marshes from miles of fresh water wetlands. All the locals know which side to work based on the waters depth.

Below a Great Egret waited on an old trunk piling as the tide turned. Water moves fast here, the current pushing fish along with it.

Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh
Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh
Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh
Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh

The larger birds hang and wait for this delivery service. Like Uber Eats, only fresher.

Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh
Egret Tidal Side Of A Marsh

Great Egret, ACE Basin.

Marsh Scene, September 2022

You would never know that Egret was sleeping there if you were standing on that dike. They like to sit by trunks to watch for small fish flowing in.

The first shot I didn’t see the floating gator head on the right. It wasn’t really obvious, which I think makes the shot more interesting.

Marsh Scene, September 2022
Marsh Scene, September 2022

Best viewed large.

Marsh Residents

A few individual photographs of several locals in a marsh. All images were taken in the Donnelley wildlife area, ACE Basin, South Carolina.

Below a Great Blue Heron flew over the open water between a dike and the thick reeds. These reeds probably go back a mile before reaching another smaller dike.

Marsh Residents
Marsh Residents
Marsh Residents
Marsh Residents

Above, a Roseate Spoonbill perched over the sale marsh side of a dike. The salt area winds along to the shore, maybe 15 miles away.

Marsh Residents
Marsh Residents

Another Great Blue Heron, here close to the edge of a tree line. It’s hard to see but another dike is back there (the line of taller brush). This section is a giant series of walled off, dikes, rice fields and retaining ponds from many years ago.

Marsh Residents
Marsh Residents

Last the classic look of a Great Egret in flight. Tall marsh grass in the back is mixed with wild rice.

The actual grain of wild rice looks to be smaller than a wheat grain. Local Native Americans did harvest it, the yield was hardly worth the effort. The rice plantations here grew an Asian rice brought up from Barbados in the 1600’s. That rice was first introduced by the Portuguese in the 1500’s.

ACE Basin, South Carolina.