Category Archives: Charleston

Young Grebe In The Fall Waters

As the reeds and cane dry out for fall, browns and some gold, become the new colors around marshes. At times they make for nice images, others it’s just drab.

Young Grebe In The Fall Waters - click to enlarge
Young Grebe In The Fall Waters – click to enlarge

Here it’s safe camouflage. The Pied-billed Grebe is a small diving bird. Fast to disappear.  Considering the number of raptors searching for them it’s a good thing.

Young Grebe In The Fall Waters - click to enlarge
Young Grebe In The Fall Waters – click to enlarge

I have seen Eagles working in tandem, coordinating their dives, chasing these tricky birds. Most of the time they do get away.

Moor Hen, Common Gallinule

When I saw this Moor Hen I remembered the darker fall look that my Heron photographs portrayed. So I took the shot of this small hen near the same spot.

Moor Hen, Common Gallinule - click to enlarge
Moor Hen, Common Gallinule – click to enlarge

A half mile stretch of marsh looks like this so I hoped they might be similar.

The Gallinule, or Moor Hen, is the pigeon of the marshlands. Not that I don’t like them, but they are everywhere and give off a loud warning.

They do provide another service. Everything out here eats them. It’s what’s for dinner.

Wood Ducks, They Were Ready For Me

This was off on a side trail that hardly ever has anything other than a few crusty Alligators. When I spotted them it was from a distance and thought I could easily walk up unnoticed.

Wood Ducks, They Were Ready For Me - click to enlarge
Wood Ducks, They Were Ready For Me – click to enlarge

This was all I had time for, the first setup shot. It was like they became invisible instantly.

They completely out smarted me !

Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2)

The first brownstone cathedral was built in 1854 and named the Cathedral of Saint John and Saint Finbar. It burned in a great fire in December 1861. The rebuilt cathedral was named for St. John the Baptist and was constructed on the foundations of the earlier structure. Architect Patrick Keely designed both the original cathedral and its replacement.

Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge

The building was of special interest to us being built out of brownstone. We could almost see the quarries for the stone from our home in Connecticut.  Portland CT stone was used in most of the NYC buildings as well.

Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge

All the images in this article were taken with a Tamron 18-400 lens, certainly not made for interior photography. I do think it worked out but on another visit I will be sure to have a few short prime lens in my pocket.

Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge

For me the images in a church is all about the lines. That worked for Notre Dame in Paris and Strasbourg, as well as the outdoors tabernacles.  I follow lines and the composition takes care of itself… I might take a bad shot, but that’s my fault.

Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) - click to enlarge
Cathedral Of St. John The Baptist (2) – click to enlarge

Charleston, South Carolina has incredible churches everywhere, the trick is to find them empty and available for a shoot.

 

Great Blue, Wide Landscape

Fall in the hot Lowcountry comes along so much different than up in New England. There’s no cold snaps here to change the colors or scenery. It’s all about time, time to fall back and stop growth.

Great Blue, Wide Landscape - click to enlarge
Great Blue, Wide Landscape – click to enlarge

Above you see how tall reeds and grasses have grown, much taller than a person. Also the seed tops and grasses are browning, some nice golden’s.

While we don’t have the traditional oranges and reds (or the trees that turn like that) we do have a changing marshland that can be just as pretty.

Note; above best viewed large.

Saker Falcon

The Saker Falcon is one of the rarest raptors and endangered due it’s incredible hunting skills. They are considered to be the premier bird for falconry in the middle east.

Ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the United Arab Emirates have been the main destination for thousands of falcons caught and sold illegally for hefty sums at the black market (the last price I heard was upwards of $65,000 USD).  Kazakhstan is estimated to lose up to 1,000 Saker falcons per year.

Saker Falcon - click to enlarge
Saker Falcon – click to enlarge

Adults are prized captures since they have already learned their skills in the wild rather than from a trainer. This eliminates breeding pairs in the wild, further shrinking the population. Great planning !!!

This bird was provided courtesy of The Avian Conservation Center, Charleston, South Carolina.