Category Archives: Black and White

Visiting Baby Rosalie

Rosalie Raymond White’s (d. 1882) headstone is actually a detailed bassinet, and her likeness is peering out of it with a green patina to her little face.

Visiting Baby Rosalie
Visiting Baby Rosalie

There was a time when creating plaster cast masks was popular. Rosalie is an example of a mask. Not many are left undamaged.

Visiting Baby Rosalie
Visiting Baby Rosalie

A number of children in this family passed at an early age. Rosalie is the only one with this type of elaborate monument though.

Visiting Baby Rosalie
Visiting Baby Rosalie

It’s not unusual to find small gifts here.

Visiting Baby Rosalie
Visiting Baby Rosalie

The stones here sit under trees, on the edge of water. A storm will take it’s toll sooner or later. However for now time has been kind to this spot.

Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina

One of the oldest and prominent streets in Charleston, South Carolina. It is known for its wealth of historic buildings.

During the 1700s, the eastern portion of Broad Street was occupied solely by merchants and craftsmen until the “Four Corners of Law” (Federal Courthouse and Post Office, the County Courthouse, City Hall, and St. Michael’s Episcopal Church) were built on their respective corners of Broad and Meeting Streets. The collection of buildings transformed Charleston into a legal and financial capital.

The wealthiest families lived ‘South Of Broad Street’. The rich plantation owners lived there,  but people outside the city began referring to their relatives as the “SOB’. You figure LOL.

Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina
Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina

This spot was also part of the original wall which protected the city from the Spanish in St. Augustine, Florida.

John Rutledge House, located at 116 Broad Street, holds a second floor drawing room where several drafts of the United States Constitution were written. At that time Charleston was the wealthiest city in the US.