Category Archives: Stork

It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

I think the marshes were at their lowest point when I shot these. The food, and the predators, were in close quarters.

Moving between watering holes was just like a parade.

It's A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)
It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

Most of the time there is a hierarchy, size wins. Speed became more important.

It's A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)
It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

The Storks were still in charge, hard to compete with those long legs.

It's A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)
It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

The Spoonbill move pretty quick too, and the Storks don’t intimidate them.

It's A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)
It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

Of course there’s always one that makes their own rules.

It's A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)
It’s A Parade, Wood Storks (And Friends)

Why not fly in? Good question. Wading birds almost always walk around if it’s not a long distance.

Wood Stork Portraits

I tired to take advantage of this Stork being in a darker environment. They prefer open water marshes. I probably took too many shots.

Wood Stork Portraits
Wood Stork Portraits

The changing water levels of the swamps in the plantation areas has started to bring them in.

Wood Stork Portraits
Wood Stork Portraits

Wood Stork Portraits

Wood Stork PortraitsHe chased a few Egrets while I watched, but that was it. At least they are here now where it is much easier to photograph them.

 

Wood Stork, Avoiding The Crowd Below

It’s good to have wings. The Stork had two options, first was climb up on the dike and walk past me, the other to fly over the piles of Alligators.

Wood Stork, Avoiding The Crowd Below
Wood Stork, Avoiding The Crowd Below

Either way he would get to the watering hole and food.

Wood Stork, Avoiding The Crowd Below
Wood Stork, Avoiding The Crowd Below

He chose the more direct route.

Monochrome Marsh

Getting these images is a lot harder when the color is gone. Texture and contrast take over and in this environment that can be ‘patchwork busy’.

Monochrome Marsh
Monochrome Marsh

I started with what I think was the most difficult photograph. Every shade you can think of is here. I think the thing saving this image is the large mix of species. Doesn’t hurt there is a little action happening.

Monochrome Marsh
Monochrome Marsh

Above is all contrast. White Wood Stork becomes the focal point.

Monochrome Marsh
Monochrome Marsh

Besides being an Alligator the texture of the skin pushes the subject out from the water. Be nice if the water was flat but it’s a swamp.

Monochrome Marsh
Monochrome Marsh

Like the Wood Stork photograph above this is light on dark. Being a young Spoonbill helped since they are lighter in color. The splashing water showed better than I thought it might.

Monochrome Marsh
Monochrome Marsh

And the final shot, a marsh landscape. Personally I think black and white landscape images are almost always boring. The three elements of ‘front, middle, and back’ are typically flat or really heavy contrast to make some definition.

In a marsh landscape like this it’s easier.

The front, small shore birds, darkened ripples of water.

The middle, so many big Alligators it’s like a used car lot.

The back, shades and texture from the reeds, mud, misc. stuff. All that gives some depth.

Articles like this, and black and white, make me think different and keep things interesting.

Oh yeah, these are really all black and white, Monochrome Marsh just sounded better.

Young Adult Wood Stork

This Wood Stork was in a swamp that was almost dry. I usually find them in marshes, again with lower water. Both places are easier feeding areas.

This was interesting since they never are in this swamp, and I am there very often.

Young Adult Wood Stork
Young Adult Wood Stork

By fall this bird will be a full adult. The last of the head feathers will be gone.

These are impressive birds, the only others in this size are adult Cranes. Wood Storks are much heavier though.

The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks

The sound was like heavy wooden sticks, spindles maybe, hitting each other. Obviously it wasn’t we were in a wildlife management area.

The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks
The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks

The Wood Storks were snapping and grabbing each other. That’s something you don’t see every day. They were also doing their own version of the ‘squawk’.

The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks
The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks

These photographs also show how tall the storks are. These are Snowy Egrets all around them.

The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks
The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks

They also bumped into a Great Egret that kept his cool, he walked by doing his best to ignore the threat.

The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks
The Sound Of Bats Hitting, Storks

He pushed right by, but if look you will see him keeping a close eye on these bigger Storks.