Category Archives: Spoonbill

Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill

I’ve seen Spoonbills bite and chase smaller Alligators, but this one was a little large for that.

Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill
Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill
Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill
Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill

A normal day in the neighborhood.

Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill
Ignoring Each Other, Alligator And Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera

Spoonbill are one of the most photogenic birds. When they sit and just watch us their colors, and of course the unique bill, still make great photographs. There’s no need for them to be doing anything at all.

Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera

(Best viewed large)

Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera

No large groups this July, which is prime time for Spoonbill.

Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera

These two have been staying around the same general location though. There’s always a chance for a few images of them.

Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera
Roseate Spoonbill Play To The Camera

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

In the 1950’s, in the Florida Keys, detailed records in a notebook started a long documented trail of the Spoonbill, Florida Everglades, and how these birds have moved their habitat to survive.

Below was photographed in the ACE Basin, South Carolina, 650 miles from Key Largo, Florida.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

As the water levels and flow changed with development and farming in Florida the breeding Spoonbills all but disappeared. They like fresh, low salt, water and 6 inches (13 c) in depth.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

However, a small percentage of young Spoonbill will travel as they reach adulthood. Enough to form new colonies. As they spread their range groups moved inland in Florida, next to the east coast around St. Augustine, and now up the Lowcountry marshes of Georgia and South Carolina.

In the ACE Basin area we see mostly young adults. The question is how many go back south a few hundred miles to breed?

It’s not that far and now there are some hidden colonies here. Did I mention Spoonbill nest where there are Alligators. There are more than enough in the ACE Basin to keep them happy.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

If the marshes keep a consistent water level that the Spoonbills like there could be large thriving colonies here.

Right now we only get to see the large pink flocks a few times a year. It would be great to photograph big flocks all year long.

Until then I am more than happy with the smaller groups. Most places have never even seen them.

 

South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill

I used ‘South Carolina’ in the tile since I have learned a lot about the Spoonbill recently. Based on that this may be one of the birds in the  first stages of local breeding out here.

South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill
South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill

Audubon in Florida has detailed notebooks going back to the 1950’s documenting the breeding patterns and nesting movements. They are resilient and have managed to survive in spite of us. Just barely though.

South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill
South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill

This juvenile was photographed in the ACE Basin 2 weeks ago. Later that day I captured a pair.

South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill
South Carolina Roseate Spoonbill

My own records show that almost 2 years ago to the day large flocks were in this same marsh area.

I hope to get out there next week to search out more of the Spoonbills.

I did not know that the Spoonbill is a species used to track the health of the Florida Everglades and southern wetlands in congressional presentations.

Smart… everybody loves a big pink bird, even our politicians.