Tag Archives: Camp

Cypress Campground Tents

These are several of the ‘Tents’, cabins, within a Methodist campground. They are individually owned and passed down through the generations. Several here are hundreds of years old.

Cypress Campground Tents
Cypress Campground Tents

They are repaired, changed a little inside, but nothing major is added / removed. Even hinges on doors may be the original hand wrought iron fixtures. Beams are the old hand cut trees.

Electricity has been added over the years, water is still from a shared central hand pump.

Meetings, like old traveling preachers days, are yearly.

Country Cabin, A Tent

The ‘tent’ camp meetings were started when a traveling preacher did the ‘riding circuits’ of the small southern communities.

The campgrounds began in the late 1700’s. Several still exist, and have camp meetings.

Country Cabin, A Tent
Country Cabin, A Tent

Meetings are held here mid September each year as they have for several hundred years.

This was our second visit to this camp and we were able to get even more detailed information. It is quite an experience to wander and photograph living history.

Cypress Campgrounds Tabernacle

Different views, and perspective, of the same location. This is the outdoor tabernacle of the Cypress Methodist Camp.

Cypress Campgrounds Tabernacle - click to enlarge
Cypress Campgrounds Tabernacle – click to enlarge

The location has been in use for a yearly revival camp for over 200 years.

Cypress Campgrounds Tabernacle - click to enlarge
Cypress Campgrounds Tabernacle – click to enlarge

The Cabins, Sepia

Cabins for church camp meetings. The meeting grounds are listed in the US National Historic Register. Rustic, yet water and power is here. A privy is out back.

The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge

Each image here was finished in a sepia color, heavy grain, mid contrasts.

The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge

These photographs are about as far away from wildlife as I shoot.

The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge

I question if they belong on the web site at all given the different subject matter and photographic style. In the past we had a separate site for work like this.

There is no story included here, hopefully the images tell one.

The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia - click to enlarge
The Cabins, Sepia – click to enlarge

Any and all comments would be appreciated.

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents

Indian Field Campground, in South Carolina, is a camp meeting site. The design is based on an octagon of 99 tents (wooden) surrounding an open air tabernacle. This layout is based on a description in Leviticus, the old testament bible. (click to view tabernacle article)

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarge

Walking towards the tabernacle in the center you get a feeling of how large this really is.

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarge

Above is taken from outside the octagon, the back of the tents. Here are open air kitchens and sitting areas.

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarge

Tents are close together. Again, the back area here. Community interaction is an important part of this once a year gathering.

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarg

A circular road runs around the campground. The far side has the all important ‘private privy’

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarge

The tents vary in size. The single-story preacher’s cabin is larger and taller than the other cabins. It has a four-panel door flanked by two-over-two light windows.

Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents - click to enlarge
Indian Field Campground, 99 Tents – click to enlarge

This camp, the newer one, was built in 1848. The convenience of a wagon (now small car) trail is spaced around the octagon. The first Indian Field Campground was held on a farm in the late 18th century. It was probably located near the first church building. 1801 was the first camp, one has been held every year since.