Category Archives: This and That

Rosalie Raymond And Friends 1882

I cannot walk past Rosalie without taking a photograph. She is one of five children buried here, all lost to disease.

Her head stone is the most elaborate being a stone baby carriage and a ‘plaster cast’ of Rosalie’s face.

Rosalie Raymond And Friends 1882
Rosalie Raymond And Friends 1882

Face casts were popular in the late 1800’s. This one remains since the monument has an overhang of stone to protect it.

Toys are left here, the panda being one that comes and goes at times.

Charleston, South Carolina.

 

Often Described Heron Trunk

This is an image best viewed large since the article is all about the details here.

Below is a ‘trunk’ I have tried to describe as part of multiple other articles. Here a Black-crowned Night Heron sits on a supporting pilon. A favorite fishing spot.

Water flows through the wood gate on the far right side. Alligator warnings and other rules are posted on it.

Often Described Heron Trunk
Often Described Heron Trunk

The main part of the structure, a huge wooden rectangular box runs underground, right through the middle of this dike.

Another wooden gate is on the other side. Opening and closing each side regulates the water flow back and forth. The marshes all have trunks. You could open them in a row of  connected dikes. That means water flows back and forth, through all the trunks, to regulate hundreds of marshes. A clever system that was first in use along the west African coast, hundreds of years ago.

A small Heron like below, or Egrets, can be found standing right in that same spot. A few times I was sure it was the same Night Heron until I noticed a second one watching from nearby.

Often Described Heron Trunk
Often Described Heron Trunk

It’s very simple to look below, spot a small fish, then drop down and grab him. The water is deep, may have a current, or more likely…an Alligator. They like fish too.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans

This is Charleston, South Carolina. It’s not unusual to find grave sites, or whole cemeteries, of confederate veterans. Hey, the war started less than 10 miles straight down the road from here.

This spot was just a little different in the individuals buried together. It caught my eye since this was my first day out in a while and I was wandering (a bit aimlessly) slowly around the old stones.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

In the 1800’s it was traditional to mark off burial plots with large, long, rectangular stone borders. The plots were for family, military regiments, or perhaps social groups like Masons.

But not here.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

This small section (above) is all CSA, confederate soldiers with no other obvious connection. Also most were not killed during the war which is how the typical CSA cemeteries are laid out.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

The obvious different age and quality of the head stones was striking.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

The largest stone was a monument to someone killed and buried elsewhere early in the war. Probably during the first incursion north by southern troops. Seabrook is an old family name in South Carolina. Why is the monument almost hidden here and not in one of the big family church grave sites.

A Corner Of Southern Veterans
A Corner Of Southern Veterans

A few markers were for veterans that died many years after the war, the early 1900’s. All were CSA soldiers, but from different units.

The last little mystery is why at this spot, this group of men. Within this cemetery, the old Umbria Plantation land, is the CSA ‘Soldiers Ground’. It actually started during the Civil War because of the large number of troops needing to be buried.  Many soldiers and sailors are buried there. This group could have been among them.

Just some thoughts and questions that occurred to me standing there, camera in hand, shooting outside in the nice weather.

All photographs taken at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.