Category Archives: This and That

Receiving Tomb

This is something I had only seen once before, in an old town cemetery in New England. I know of 3 in the Lowcountry.

A receiving tomb is a temporary shelter to hold the deceased until burial. Having no refrigeration brick structures, partly underground, hold the bodies until burial.

Most times this was used while family and friends came from distances. Here it could a day or more to arrive from Charleston, 20 miles away.

Receiving Tomb
Receiving Tomb

Known receiving tombs in the Lowcountry ;

  1. Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston
  2. Bethany Cemetery, Charleston
  3. Strawberry Chapel, Berkeley County

 

Entering Strawberry Chapel

By today’s standards the chapel is small. This photograph was taken looking in through the single front door. Most everything in this image is original to the chapel.

Behind the altar is a welcome sign and a small bough. Created with petals from pine cones I believe these were added in the 1850’s.

Entering Strawberry Chapel
Entering Strawberry Chapel

Even now this is in a rural spot on a dead end road, the only building remaining of Childsbury Town 1707.

Harleston Family Plot, Strawberry Chapel

The Harlestons were a remarkable family, not least because they managed to achieve so much financial, cultural and educational success at a time when the country denied equal opportunity to anyone with one drop of black blood. (Washington Post)

Please follow this link.

The link above is from a review of the book ‘The Sweet Hell Inside’, written by Edward Ball who was given the family papers and documents by Edwina Harleston.

The Ball family plot is a few yards from here in the graveyard of Strawberry Chapel.

Harleston Family Plot, Strawberry Chapel
Harleston Family Plot, Strawberry Chapel
Harleston Family Plot, Strawberry Chapel
Harleston Family Plot, Strawberry Chapel

Members of the Ball family kindly opened  the Chapel and it’s grounds the other day. Representatives of (click here) Drayton Hall plantation along with the Ball family arranged a small group tour and talk… and of course we had to photograph the Chapel and grounds.

For approximately 6 years Ellen and I have ‘peeked’ over the tall rock walls at Strawberry. This a unique historical site, all the more so since it has been kept private to preserve family history and integrity of the property.

Strawberry Chapel, Childsbury Towne, South Carolina.

Very Orwellian

It was a rainy dull day in August, and the clocks were striking thirteen. (Apologies to Mr. Orwell.)

Orwellian
Orwellian

This may also be a production line for “Soylent Red,” “Soylent Yellow,” or the latest product, far more flavorful and nutritious, “Soylent Green.” (Apologies to Mr. Harrison.)

Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian

If there was ever a series of photographs made for various styles of monochrome this is it.

Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian
Orwellian

Taken on the Richard B. Russell Dam, Savannah River, between South Carolina and Georgia.

  • Canon 7D2
  • Tamron 18-400
  • Adobe Lightroom
  • NIK Silver Efex
  • Topaz DeNoise AI
  • DxO FilmPack 6

Guillebeau House, 1764

Guillebeau House is a historic home located in Hickory Knob State Park near Willington in McCormick County, South Carolina. It was built in about 1764 and is a double-pen log house with one exterior chimney and two front entrances. It has a full-width, shed-roof porch.

Built by Andre Guillebeau (1739-1814) shortly after his arrival at the French Huguenot settlement known as New Bordeaux, the house was moved to Hickory Knob in about 1983.  It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. (Wikipedia)

Guillebeau House
Guillebeau House

This house can be rented from the state, and we did. It’s old, dark, small, musty, and very impressive. There is actually a second floor with stairs built for short people with oddly long legs. I did go up a few times, but we kept to the first floor.

Guillebeau House
Guillebeau House

When the house was moved the inside was renovated to allow…wait for it;

  • Heat
  • A/C
  • Working Kitchen
  • Electricity (obviously)
  • WIFI
  • Indoor Bathroom

I have described this as going camping, hey it’s all relative. Real camping is something I have experienced (military, married to someone from Maine) and do my best to avoid.

Guillebeau House
Guillebeau House

Hickory Knob is by the Savanah River, large, and very dark at night. There were no people around, for miles.

Unfortunately it was raining for most of the days we stayed. It was a nice home base for us while we explored the area which was new to us.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole

I did not give these little guys enough credit, they are clever and have impressed us.

Click here for the first shot of this one, taken two days ago.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole
Clever Critters, Porch Anole

Each summer Carolina Anoles are hatched somewhere on our back porch. They are tiny at first and after the first year we discovered how entertaining (and easy) they are as visitors.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole
Clever Critters, Porch Anole

I’m sure their brain is miniscule so how bright can they be.

Turns out they had us fooled.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole
Clever Critters, Porch Anole

We don’t give them names but we have identified them by size. Currently this one is called ‘mid-size’. The old mid-size is now the ‘big one’.

He had survived and grown by catching things we can’t even see, or want to see. But now he’s too big for that.

He has by necessity discovered hunting, and all the dangers, in the wide world outside the back porch where it as safe.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole
Clever Critters, Porch Anole

Except he is clever enough to leave the porch by day, hunt, and return to his spot each night. After dark we can find him climbing back up into the catch all shelves. At the top shelf he climbs on the old dime store thermometer, grabs hold, and sleeps better than anyone else in this house.

He will start the day hiding in the brackets until awake enough to brave the dangerous world once again.

Clever Critters, Porch Anole
Clever Critters, Porch Anole

Oh yes, he has discovered watching people is entertaining and easy.

You never know what you might find out here.