Hopsewee Plantation

Hopsewee Plantation – 1735

We spotted the building from the Santee River the previous day. While it wasn’t a clear enough view for a photograph it was obviously an old plantation. Having a cell in your pocket (OK, Ellen’s pocket) is an amazing tool when out here.

Below was taken from the river bank, next day after we found it. Plantation homes always faced the river, roads were few.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

The original name here was Hopsewee-on-the-Santee, a rice plantation. Built in 1735, I can’t even imagine how. Even now this is ‘out there’.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

This was the home of Thomas Lynch, Jr., a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and served as a Lowcountry rice plantation. He was lost at sea not long after the declaration’s signing while traveling to Barbados.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

Like many Santee plantations, it was abandoned during the Civil War. After the war, rice was never planted again, but the Lucas family continued to occupy Hopsewee. In September 1949, Col. and Mrs. Wilkinson bought the house and family still occupied it.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

This is another plantation out here built from Black Cypress trees. Almost indestructible.

 

4 thoughts on “Hopsewee Plantation – 1735”

    1. I can’t get over the fact that there are so many fascinating old places to learn about. I always appreciate seeing your photos and learning more – thanks for sharing.

    2. It’s like a treasure hunt sometimes. We have been lucky to meet some local historians, very old Charleston families, and conservation groups since we moved here. That has opened up amazing places we would never know exists.

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