A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

In the 1950’s, in the Florida Keys, detailed records in a notebook started a long documented trail of the Spoonbill, Florida Everglades, and how these birds have moved their habitat to survive.

Below was photographed in the ACE Basin, South Carolina, 650 miles from Key Largo, Florida.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

As the water levels and flow changed with development and farming in Florida the breeding Spoonbills all but disappeared. They like fresh, low salt, water and 6 inches (13 c) in depth.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

However, a small percentage of young Spoonbill will travel as they reach adulthood. Enough to form new colonies. As they spread their range groups moved inland in Florida, next to the east coast around St. Augustine, and now up the Lowcountry marshes of Georgia and South Carolina.

In the ACE Basin area we see mostly young adults. The question is how many go back south a few hundred miles to breed?

It’s not that far and now there are some hidden colonies here. Did I mention Spoonbill nest where there are Alligators. There are more than enough in the ACE Basin to keep them happy.

A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill
A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill

If the marshes keep a consistent water level that the Spoonbills like there could be large thriving colonies here.

Right now we only get to see the large pink flocks a few times a year. It would be great to photograph big flocks all year long.

Until then I am more than happy with the smaller groups. Most places have never even seen them.

 

5 thoughts on “A Very Tenacious Animal, Roseate Spoonbill”

  1. I always like when you include so many birds in a scene. On the first photo you have a very beautiful background and that is what makes the photo stunning!

    1. Florida Audubon has amazing detailed charts and records of how they moved their range to compensate for the changing waters.

      It’s an adventure when a flock comes in close and ignores us. The snapping beaks sound like Spanish dancers LOL

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