Tag Archives: South Carolina

Tricolored Heron Fishing

Color and reflection are what pushed me to this photograph over the other shots taken at the same time. The dripping water from the bird, down to the reflection you can’t plan.

This bird, in this light, is a hard image. The colors are vibrant, almost too much so. These birds, vivid yellows and red eyes are actually too dramatic. During the development here I softened the colors. Twice I checked myself to see if I had pushed colors. I did not.

Tricolored Heron Fishing - Click To Enlarge
Tricolored Heron Fishing – Click To Enlarge

In the sun, this is what you see.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating

Photographing swallows in flight, no matter how much planning, is also about luck. Here we found a flock, apparently selecting mates, working around a single pipe sticking up out of a marsh. As long as we had an idea of where they should be we were good.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge

A mate is selected based on their flying display. We watched, and captured, this fascinating show.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge

A female ( an assumption on my part) would land on the pipe and others would fly, swoop, and sometimes brush, by her. If one was too close they met in mid air.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge

When a bird flew away from the pipe others would either land or circle around it.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge

Select any image below to view the gallery.

Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating - Click To Enlarge
Swallows, In Flight Speed Dating – Click To Enlarge

 

 

Belted Kingfisher

This female Kingfisher was caught in a fly by shot. Here I was ready since she had been moving pretty consistently between 2 perches.

They are too fast to catch unless you have seen a pattern in their flight. I don’t even try now. I prefer to shoot a sitting shot, then watch. In general I get the first image done and out of the way.

Belted Kingfisher - Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher – Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher - Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher – Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher - Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher – Click To Enlarge

Again (like the last Kingfisher images published)  there were no diving shots taken. The bird never even attempted one.

Belted Kingfisher - Click To Enlarge
Belted Kingfisher – Click To Enlarge

 

 

A Red Tailed Hawk

This bird is blind in one eye. You would never know that based on how she can be so acrobatic in the air. Unfortunately her eye sight is just bad enough to prevent hunting for food.

Red Tailed Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Red Tailed Hawk – Click To Enlarge

The Center For Birds Of Prey nursed her back to health after a rescue. But now she must live there and not be released. That does not stop her from flying high and landing in the large pines at the center. Once in the tree someone had better have a snack to get her down.

Red Tailed Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Red Tailed Hawk – Click To Enlarge
Red Tailed Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Red Tailed Hawk – Click To Enlarge

Note: A black and white photograph similar to the one above was previously published.

Regal Lanner Falcon

These photographs were taken of a Lanner Falcon that is used for falcon education and demonstrations by the Avian Conservation Center, South Carolina.

Regal Lanner Falcon - Click To Enlarge
Regal Lanner Falcon – Click To Enlarge
Regal Lanner Falcon - Click To Enlarge
Regal Lanner Falcon – Click To Enlarge

This is a large sized falcon at 43–50 cm (17–20 in) length with a wingspan of 95–105 cm (37–41 in).

They are beautiful birds that look similar to a Kestrel or Peregrine Falcon, just larger.

 

Harris Hawk In Flight

An embarrassment of riches, old idiom, but so true here. When we processed our photographs of raptors taken at the Avian Conservation Center the idea was to publish a second series. The first was completed March 2016. Instead it has been piece meal publishing.

One of my favorite for in flight photographs is the Harris Hawk. Which appears to have promptly gone down a black hole.

Harris Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Harris Hawk – Click To Enlarge

The shot above is a Harris Hawk setting up to land on a stump.

Harris Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Harris Hawk – Click To Enlarge

Here is the perfect landing.

Harris Hawk - Click To Enlarge
Harris Hawk – Click To Enlarge

What is not visible in these photos is a transmitter he wore. This hawk is flying loose, lands in trees, and glides low over the field before coming back for food. They have been known to fight with local hawks flying by, and once in a while take a small field trip.

Common Gallinule

‘Loud and runs on water’ .

They hide in reeds and brush until you are almost on top of them, then suddenly flap, run with a big toed foot, squealing all the way. Since they live with the alligators when you find these birds they scare the heck out of you. Splashing and squawks are something I try to avoid.

Common Gallinule - Click To Enlarge
Common Gallinule – Click To Enlarge

BTW, that’s not how any birder would ID them, but it is a good description.

Common Gallinule - Click To Enlarge
Common Gallinule – Click To Enlarge
Common Gallinule - Click To Enlarge
Common Gallinule – Click To Enlarge

Another name for this bird is a Moorhen. For a long time I thought a Moorhen was a different species. People would point out a bird, and give it another name. They looked the same to me, but I learn from others so it must be me. Well, they changed the name a few years ago.

I thought only famous people could do that.