Chapel Of Ease

Chapel Of Ease, Three

These historic buildings have recently been either damaged by age, or vandalism. They are all a ‘Chapel Of Ease’, old Anglican Church buildings. When built it was to provide a church building far from the main parish church. Travel in the outer lands was difficult at best.

Having visited these in the past I thought a small article and photographs of how they were prior to any new damage might be of interest…like a snap shot of history.

Below is Strawberry Chapel, the most intact chapel. The only one I know of not being damaged during the revolution and civil war.  It was completed in 1725 in Childsbury, South Carolina. The chapel is all the exists of the town.

Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease

Pon Pon Chapel Of Ease is shown below. In spite of on going efforts the structure continues to fall. This chapel, first wood, was also built in 1725. Previous settlements were destroyed in the Yammasee War, a Native American tribe that fought the English here and Spanish in Georgia just south.

Eventually the Yammasee, and Creek, kept going south away from the invaders to join the Seminoles in southern Florida.

The chapel has been burned numerous times and now is a ruin. What has kept it standing is the remote location. A dirt power line road is the only access. However…we found it LOL.

Pon Pon Chapel (1)
Pon Pon Chapel (1)
Pon Pon Chapel Of Ease
Pon Pon Chapel Of Ease

Last here is St. Helena chapel on the St. Helena Barrier Island near the Georgia border.

Built in the mid 1700’s it was owner by the local planters until 1885 when the island was abandon and taken by the union army.

As expected this chapel also has been burned, a few times.

The structure was created using ‘tabby’ as concrete and this is one of the best examples in the US of the technique. Tabby is burnt oyster shells, lime, water and ash, only used in the Lowcountry and Georgia. It is an ancient Spanish concrete. Morocco is known for Spanish Tabby also. Georgia and Florida were part of the Spanish Empire when this chapel was built.

Chapel Of Ease
Chapel Of Ease
An Old Chapel Made With Tabby
An Old Chapel Made With Tabby

No wildlife in the article, brief local history instead.

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