Tag Archives: landscape

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

Built in 1735 on the banks of Hampton Creek, a tributary of the Santee River. It is also one of the state’s best examples of a wood frame Georgian plantation house and on the National Historic registry.

Built of Black Cypress it is another of the buildings that has survived for centuries in a harsh environment because of the local wood used.

The area is marshland and known as the Santee Delta.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

The plantation was created in one the most remote swamp / marsh areas I can think. Even today it’s not easy to find, we took a boat.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

This was taken on our second attempt to get more photographs, this time we were allowed inside on the main floor (photos to be finished soon I hope).

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

As you would expect the line of historical figures and events, even way out here, are unbelievable.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

Classic B&W photographs are always a favorite way for me to work historical sites, I had to do at least a few in the format.

 

Bridges In Magnolia

Heading to a local marsh we cut through the old garden area of Magnolia Plantation. While I didn’t have the right gear with me the other morning I gave in and grabbed a few snapshots.

This day they opened the gates prior to dawn to give photographers early access. I think five different photographers were scattered around.

Bridges In Magnolia
Bridges In Magnolia

Our shortcuts include bridges since the old garden was built around swamps. Above is ‘the red bridge’ used to cross over one. Magnolia does have maps of the grounds, it’s big, but we have our own names for places. Not creative but if you tell a local photog a big gator is by the red bridge, well we all know the same spot.

Sun was coming up through the back marsh trees, it was pretty, so even though I had to shoot at 150 mm I figured it would be OK.

Bridges In Magnolia
Bridges In Magnolia

And of course the ‘long white bridge’, descriptive not creative.

This bridge is a southern icon. Small miniatures are in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington. It was first built in the 1700’s. Engagement and wedding photos are a daily occurrence, just not at dawn.

It was dark when the above was taken. You can’t help yourself when here with a camera. I’ll add this to 7 billion other shots.

BTW, one of the huge Live Oaks crashed down on the bridge last year. Flatten part of it. You can see how big those old trees are.

To repair the bridge, exactly as it had been for 300 years, was a big project. They found old Black Cypress trees, the same age as the original logs, at the bottom of swamps and had artists recreate every detail.

While working from small boats they had an ongoing audience. Of course they were Alligators, it’s a swamp.

We live just down the road so Ellen has many posts documenting the repairs at www.PassingByPhoto.com.

Magnolia Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina.

Marsh Scene, Eagle, Alligator

So… the one time I’m not on that dike !

I was shooting wide to get some of the rare colors here when the Bald Eagle did his guest appearance. Flying straight and low along the top of a dike we walk.

View this full size and you can also find a decent sized Alligator just below in the water.

Marsh Scene, Eagle, Alligator
Marsh Scene, Eagle, Alligator

Personally I don’t think the world needs another Eagle closeup, this tells the story of where they live and hunt.

Marsh Scene, Eagle, Alligator
Marsh Scene, Eagle, Alligator

Not that I don’t have a few closer Eagle shots still to be published though.

Hopsewee Plantation – 1735

We spotted the building from the Santee River the previous day. While it wasn’t a clear enough view for a photograph it was obviously an old plantation. Having a cell in your pocket (OK, Ellen’s pocket) is an amazing tool when out here.

Below was taken from the river bank, next day after we found it. Plantation homes always faced the river, roads were few.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

The original name here was Hopsewee-on-the-Santee, a rice plantation. Built in 1735, I can’t even imagine how. Even now this is ‘out there’.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

This was the home of Thomas Lynch, Jr., a signer of the¬†Declaration of Independence, and served as a¬†Lowcountry rice plantation. He was lost at sea not long after the declaration’s signing while traveling to Barbados.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

Like many Santee plantations, it was abandoned during the Civil War. After the war, rice was never planted again, but the Lucas family continued to occupy Hopsewee. In September 1949, Col. and Mrs. Wilkinson bought the house and family still occupied it.

Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation
Hopsewee Plantation

This is another plantation out here built from Black Cypress trees. Almost indestructible.

 

American Black Ducks

Eagles were around overhead. When they drop down too close it’s a mass exit, with much splashing.

At the time I did not know they were Black Ducks, Ellen used the Merlin phone app later to ID them.

American Black Ducks
American Black Ducks

Catching the chaotic take off is always hit or miss for me. I can’t be too close, lose focus for a minute, and generally hope the camera does it’s job too.

American Black Ducks
American Black Ducks

Above two photographs are the same flock, below was a second group.

American Black Ducks
American Black Ducks

ACE Basin, South Carolina.