Category Archives: Wide Photographs

A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene

This is the marsh scene we always want to capture, but have no control over. The scenery, and all the locals, have to play their part in this.

A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene
A Marsh Scene, No, A Great Marsh Scene

The obvious players are the two Alligators swimming through, as well as the fishing Great Blue Herons.

If you view this full size you can see a Night Heron in the air. The far back of the marsh, along the waters edge has small figures. These are most likely a hundred American Black Ducks.

An amazing sight.

Donnelley, South Carolina.

 

Found On A Walk

Taken in the First Scots Presbyterian church yard. One of the many churches in the center of town here, Charleston.

Found On A Walk
Found On A Walk

Founded in 1731, this current building of brick was finished in 1814. Wooden structures don’t last long here. Only a single bell is here now, donated from  St. Johns Church in Preston, Lancashire, England around 1886. The original bells were melted during the US Civil War. The earthquake of 1886 damaged most of Charleston but one tower in First Scots remained strong enough to hang a single St. Johns bell.

First Scots
First Scots

Note; Above, a Polaroid filter image of the entrance to First Scots.

Meeting Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

 

Scenes From Walking A Dike

We were following the sightings of lots of birds. I carried my usual long lens gear, plus a backup with short lens, my monopod, and a gear bag. Never do this if above the age of 25. Besides you can’t sneak up on anything, you have become like a traveling circus.

Anyway, I really wanted to grab a few images of this long dike and what we see. This connects (below) with 3 other dikes and marshes.

The first photograph is a good example of how using trunks (gates) moves water between marshes.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

There is a wooden rectangular box inside the dike with the gates on either side. A few hundred years ago that would have been a large hollow log. Same basic design from 1600’s until now. These shots are a month old, nothing changes.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

Above is looking back to where we had started, the trunk being behind me now. Both images taken from the same spot. Thankfully the center had been recently cut.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

A little further on is an area wide open for miles. At times filled with birds, others like this day not much happening. There was a breeze, bigger birds tend to avoid openings like this with wind.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

This day we turned back and walked the same route. With all the dikes connecting here we have multiple options for a return to where we left the car. Which of course is on another dike.

Scenes From Walking A Dike
Scenes From Walking A Dike

These photographs were taken at Bear Island, a wildlife management area. The dikes shown here and the roads entering the area are now closed until mid February. Bear is one of the largest locations for migratory birds in the U.S., with a few exceptions this is a safe place for large water fowl.

 

Marsh Scene

One of those quiet marsh scenes that has many little things happening.

The obvious first thing seen is the line of White Pelicans. I believe at this time the group was moving towards the far side to join a larger flock.

Marsh Scene
Marsh Scene

Right behind the Pelicans is a lone Tricolored Heron. In the background, along the marsh edge I found a Great Blue blending in as well as what looks to be a small Egret above him. That’s a dike path it is standing on.

Finally, and hard to find, left top appears to be a Swallow in flight. A guess for sure, but a safe bet as they are always zipping around here. View full screen and to me it’s a Swallow.

Taken in an old rice field, Donnelley wildlife area, South Carolina.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

Built in 1735 on the banks of Hampton Creek, a tributary of the Santee River. It is also one of the state’s best examples of a wood frame Georgian plantation house and on the National Historic registry.

Built of Black Cypress it is another of the buildings that has survived for centuries in a harsh environment because of the local wood used.

The area is marshland and known as the Santee Delta.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

The plantation was created in one the most remote swamp / marsh areas I can think. Even today it’s not easy to find, we took a boat.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

This was taken on our second attempt to get more photographs, this time we were allowed inside on the main floor (photos to be finished soon I hope).

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

As you would expect the line of historical figures and events, even way out here, are unbelievable.

1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation
1735 Porch, Hampton Plantation

Classic B&W photographs are always a favorite way for me to work historical sites, I had to do at least a few in the format.